Rubjerg Knude: The Lighthouse Buried in Sand

Rubjerg Knude Lighthouse is an abandoned lighthouse located on the coast of the North Sea in Rubjerg, in northern Denmark. The light in Rubjerg Knude Lighthouse was lit for the first time the December, 27, 1900. The lighthouse was built on the coastal slope’s highest point 60 meters above sea level and a good 200 meters inland.

The lighthouse tower is 23 meters high, and when it was built there were no large dunes around it. But with time the sea moved in closer and the wind blew large amounts of sand up from the cliff. The sand piled up in front of and around the lighthouse, filled the well and ruined the kitchen gardens.

To suppress the sand pine grates were set in and lyme grass and helmet was planted in the dune, but the efforts went vain as the sand dune continued to grow. At last the sand was so high that at times it was impossible to see the light from the sea. On August 1, 1968 the struggle was given up and the lighthouse was lit for the last time.

Since then the lighthouse has become a popular visitor attraction on the Jutland coast. For a number of years, the buildings were used as a museum and coffee shop, but continually shifting sands caused them to be abandoned as well in 2002. It’s predicted that the lighthouse will fall into the sea in 15 to 20 years time.

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Eerie Abandoned Places From Around The World

 

Island Home, Finland

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Methodist Church, Gary, Indiana

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Soviet naval testing station in Makhachkala, Russia

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Church steeple in the middle of a frozen lake, Reschen, Italy

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Lake Reschen is an artificial reservoir. When it was built, it submerged many villages, including a 14th century church.

 

Victorian-style tree house, Florida, USA

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An abandoned hallway, France.

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Spreepark, Berlin, Germany

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Poveglia Island, Italy

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This island was used by Napoleon Bonaparte to isolate those with the plague from those who were healthy. It was later used as an asylum for those struggling from extreme mental health issues.

 

Abandoned bumper cars, Chernobyl, Ukraine

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Overgrown palace, Poland

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An abandoned house in the forest. Location unknown.

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Abandoned Movie theater in Detroit, Michigan

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Church in St. Etienne, France

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Update: after doing some research I discovered the above church is a composite photograph. I was curious as to why a small stream went through a church.

 

Shipwrecks on a sandbar in the Bermuda Triangle

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Staircase to nowhere, Pismo Beach, California

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Initially there was a supported catwalk to the top of the staircase that allowed people to get to the beach.

Kangaroo Island Road

 

Kangaroo Island, also known as Karta (“island of the dead”), is Australia’s third-largest island, after Tasmania and Melville Island. It lies in the state of South Australia 112 km (70 mi) southwest of Adelaide. Its closest point to the mainland is Snapper Point in Backstairs Passage, which is 13.5 km (8.4 mi) from the Fleurieu Peninsula.

The island and road was affected this year by the devastating bush fires.

Photos capture the stark beauty of ‘Storm Area 51’ grounds

© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell

MYSTERY WIRE — They were a long way from home when “Storm Area 51” hit.

Photographers Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell were in Los Angeles for photo meetings, and they had California on their minds. That is, until Matty Roberts distracted them with the social media fervor surrounding Storm Area 51.

They decided to document the Nevada site at the center of it all. So in the middle of August, Koopmans and Wexell headed for the heat of Nevada’s desert.

The landscape was like nothing they had seen. Koopmans works out of Amsterdam, and Wexell is from Stockholm.

Here are some of the images they captured for GQ Australia. They have also been published online by Wired. They are used here by permission.

© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell
© Ryan Koopmans and Alice Wexell

National Geographic Best Photos of the Year

Leonardo’s “Mona Lisa” is believed to depict Lisa Gherardini, the wife of Francesco del Giocondo, a Florentine silk merchant. Every year, millions of visitors jostle for a view at the Louvre Museum in Paris. The painting, protected by a thick layer of glass that must be cleaned regularly, has never been restored.

 

Petronella Chigumbura, a member of the Akashinga—a nonprofit, all-female anti-poaching unit—practices reconnaissance techniques in the Zimbabwean bush.

 

A male elephant grabs an evening snack in Mozambique’s Gorongosa National Park. Most of the park’s elephants were killed for their ivory, used to buy weapons during the nation’s 15-year civil war, which ended in 1992. With poaching controlled, the population is recovering.

 

Marines have to be able to carry one another if necessary. USMC Cpl. Gabrielle Green hefts a fellow marine as they ready for deployment on a Navy ship at Camp Lejeune, North Carolina. Of the 38,000 recruits who enter the corps each year, about 3,500 are women—or, in USMC phrasing, “female marines.”

 

Canadian soldiers climb on the wreckage of a plane, roughly a thousand miles south of the North Pole, to scout the area during an Arctic survival course on Cornwallis Island. As the Arctic warms and tensions over its future rise, the Canadian and U.S. militaries have stepped up operations in the region.

 

Some 400 U.S. soldiers practice parachute jumps near Alaska’s Fort Greely. The multinational exercise, which includes Canadian forces, prepares troops for the rigors of large, coordinated operations in extreme cold conditions.

 

In Agadez, Niger, an Izala school educates about 1,300 students. Izala is a back-to-basics Islamic reformist movement that adheres to conservative practices, such as women covering their faces, but also prizes education.

 

Children nap at a kindergarten in Mongolia’s Bayanzurkh District. Each room is equipped with an air purifier, in an attempt to lower the level of indoor air pollution. Children are especially vulnerable to poor air quality.

 

Sal Thegal dressed like a hot dog at the Minnesota State Fair on Friday, August 23, 2019.

 

A Temminck’s ground pangolin named Tamuda searches for a meal of ants or termites at a rehabilitation center in Zimbabwe. He was rescued from illegal wildlife traders, who likely would have smuggled his scales to Asia for use in traditional remedies.

 

A crocodile rests in Mozambique’s Gorongosa National Park, where wildlife’s future depends on humans’ livelihoods.

 

Two rats at India’s Karni Mata Temple box to determine which is dominant. Rats are social animals that take good care of their offspring. Studies show they will free a fellow rat from a small cage—even if it means giving up a treat. This suggests to some researchers that rats feel empathy.

 

Behind netting, a polar bear dances at the Circus on Ice in Kazan, Russia. Performing polar bears are extremely rare. The show’s four bears wear metal muzzles, and their trainer, Yulia Denisenko, carries a metal rod. Between tricks, the bears lie down and rub themselves on the ice.

 

Clay, Daniel, and Enzo, three of 39 tigers rescued from an animal park in Oklahoma, gather at a pool at the Wild Animal Sanctuary in Keenesburg, Colorado. These cats will live out their lives here, with proper nutrition and vet care.

 

Lions that were released and collared in a remote region of the 4,500-square-kilometer Zambeze Delta area of Mozambique lounge in the early morning mist.

 

Incahuasi, “House of the Inca” in Quechua, was an island when Bolivia’s Salar de Uyuni salt flat was a lake in prehistoric times. A remnant of a volcano, it’s covered in cacti, some towering 40 feet, and fossilized algae. Extracting lithium from under the salt flat is certain to alter the spectacular landscape.

 

Fourteen-year-old Danila holds a baby alpaca near Huaylillas in the highlands of northern Peru.

 

This book is a romance novel, but National Liberation Front (ELN) Comandante Yesenia also reads aloud to her river outpost compatriots from works of ideology and ELN history. At 36, she has spent more than half her life as a guerrilla fighter in Colombia; her two children live with civilian relatives.

 

The majority of residents in Uganda’s Bidibidi refugee camp are children, many of whom also work to help their families. In a small shop near his home in Zone 5, 13-year-old Steven Ladu sells candy.

Mount Thor Steep Galore

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Mount Thor, officially gazetted as Thor Peak, is a mountain with an elevation of 1,675 metres (5,495 ft) located in Auyuittuq National Park, on Baffin Island, Nunavut, Canada. The mountain is located 46 km (29 mi) northeast of Pangnirtung and features Earth’s greatest vertical drop of 1,250 m (4,101 ft), with the cliff overhanging at an average angle of 15 degrees from vertical. Despite its remoteness, this feature makes the mountain a popular rock climbing site. Camping is allowed, with the only official site being at the entrance to the Akshayuk Valley near Overlord Peak.

 

I don’t know about climbing it, maybe a parachute jump from the top.

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Mount Thor is part of the Baffin Mountains which in turn form part of the Arctic Cordillera mountain range. The mountain is made of granite and is the most famous of Canada’s mountains named “Thor”. Despite the fact the mountain is in a remote area, it’s a popular destination for avid mountain climbers. Mount Thor was first climbed in 1965 during the Alpine Club of Canada by an expedition led by Pat Baird. In July 2006, the first successful longest rappel was set on Mount Thor by an American team.

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Australia’s Best Rated Beach, one small problem, it is located on an Island 2,100 miles off the Australian Mainland

This is an A-1 Gold Star Paradise located in the Indian Ocean, roughly midway between Australia and Sri Lanka. The Territory of the Cocos (KeelingIslands, also called Cocos Islands and Keeling Islands, is a territory of Australia. The beaches are spectacular.

 

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Daily Mail Online

Did your favourite make the cut? Incredible beach that you’ve probably never heard of is named Australia’s best – as Bondi fails to make the top 20

  • Beach expert Brad Farmer released his book, 101 Best Beaches 2017, with Cossies Beach taking the top spot
  • It is a remote beach in the Indian Ocean, 3,000 km north-west of Perth, and can be reached by a 4.5hr flight
  • Cossies was named after Australian Governor-General Peter Cosgrove in the Cocos (Keeling) Islands  

Natural beauty has landed a remote beach in the Indian Ocean the prestigious title of Australia’s best beach.

Tourism Australia’s beach ambassador Brad Farmer released his book on Saturday, 101 Best Beaches 2017, crowning Cossies Beach – named after Governor-General Peter Cosgrove – in the Cocos Islands as the country’s top sandy shore.

‘It’s as near to perfect as a beach can be,’ Farmer said, comparing it to the Whitehaven Beach in the Whitsundays.

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Farmer has been writing about beaches for the past 30 years and has seen about 4,000 Australian beaches in his lifetime.

With his colleague Professor Andy Short, a coastal geomorphologist, Farmer spent almost half a year trekking around Australia’s coastline to assess the nation’s top beaches.

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Territory of Australia
• Annexed by the
British Empire
1857
• Transferred to
Australian control
1955
Area
• Total
14 km2 (5 sq mi)
• Water (%)
0
Population
• July 2014 estimate
596
• Density
43/km2 (111.4/sq mi))

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The Surreal Landscape of Deadvlei, Namibia

The picture below is not that of a painting. It was taken inside the Namib-Naukluft Park in Namibia, in a strange and alien landscape called Dead Vlei. Although sounds similar to “dead valley”, Dead Vlei is not an actually valley. The term means “dead marsh” (from English dead, and Afrikaans vlei, a lake or marsh in a valley between the dunes).

Deadvlei is a white clay pan located near the more famous salt pan of Sossusvlei, scattered with hundreds of dead Acacia trees that once thrived when water from the Tsauchab River soaked this piece of land. Some 900 years ago the river diverted its course, leaving Dead Vlei literally high and dry. Dead Vlei has been claimed to be surrounded by the highest sand dunes in the world, the highest reaching 300-400 meters which rest on a sandstone terrace.

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Abgestorbene Akazien im Dead vlei, Namibia