Uncontacted Peoples

The Brazilian government has confirmed the existence of a previously unknown group of so-called uncontacted people who have remained isolated from industrial society.

The Brazilian government agency charged with protecting the country’s indigenous tribes took aerial photographs of the group’s Amazon dwellings. The photos were released by Survival International, an advocacy group for indigenous people.

Survival International research director Fiona Watson talked to Wired.com about the photos.

House
The structure of the dwelling is very different from those seen in photographs of another uncontacted Amazon group that were released in February. Unlike those small, open dwellings, these are large and enclosed.

“Probably 20 or 30 people could fit in there,” said Watson. “You can see smaller structures toward the back of the house. These could be areas for cooking, or storing things. I’ve been to indigenous villages where they have separate structures for keeping the large birds from which they pluck feathers to make arrows.”

 

 

 

 

Below are photographs taken of an uncontacted group found along the Peru-Brazil border in 2008.  These jungle inhabitants seem annoyed, or terrified, at the airplane taking the pictures.  They are pointing their arrows at the plane.  This plane must have blown their minds.  Never would they have seen such a large bird of prey.  They must have thought this giant rigid bird was going to pounce on their people.  Some of them look like medicine shamans, painted in a dark colour.

 

 

 

 

Uncontacted people, also referred to as isolated people or lost tribes, are communities who live, or have lived, either by choice or by circumstance, without significant contact with globalised civilisation.

Few peoples have remained totally uncontacted by modern civilisation, and almost all current groups are in danger of being unwillingly contacted. Indigenous rights activists call for such groups to be left alone in respect of their right to self-determination. A number have chosen to make contact either exceedingly difficult or dangerous for those trying to reach them.

The majority of such communities are located in densely-forested areas in South America and New Guinea. Knowledge of the existence of these groups comes mostly from infrequent (and often violent) encounters by neighbouring tribes, and also from aerial footage. A major problem with contacting isolated people is that they will lack any immunity to common diseases, which can be devastating to a closely-contained population with no natural immunity.

Areas of the world where uncontacted peoples live.

Coffee

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cool coffee

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Main exporters by country in 2015/16

Country 60 kilogram bags Metric Tons Pounds
BrazilBrazil 43,200,000 2,592,000 5,714,381,000
VietnamVietnam 27,500,000 1,650,000 3,637,627,000
ColombiaColombia 13,500,000 810,000 1,785,744,000
IndonesiaIndonesia 11,000,000 660,000 1,455,050,000
EthiopiaEthiopia 6,400,000 384,000 846,575,000
HondurasHonduras 5,800,000 348,000 767,208,000
IndiaIndia 5,800,000 348,000 767,208,000
UgandaUganda 4,800,000 288,000 634,931,000
MexicoMexico 3,900,000 234,000 515,881,000
GuatemalaGuatemala 3,400,000 204,000 449,743,000
PeruPeru 3,200,000 192,000 423,287,000
NicaraguaNicaragua 2,200,000 132,000 291,010,000
ChinaChina(2013/14 est.) 1,947,000 116,820 257,544,000
Ivory CoastIvory Coast 1,800,000 108,000 238,099,000
Costa RicaCosta Rica 1,492,000 89,520 197,357,000
KenyaKenya 833,000 49,980 110,187,000
Papua New GuineaPapua New Guinea 800,000 48,000 105,821,000
TanzaniaTanzania 800,000 48,000 105,821,000

coffee

 

New Population Statistics Canadian Cities

Montreal

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Population of census metropolitan areas
2012 2013 2014 2015
persons (thousands)
St. John’s (N.L.) 205.9 209.1 212.3 214.3
Halifax (N.S.) 406.7 410.0 413.6 417.8
Moncton (N.B.)1 142.8 144.4 146.1 148.0
Saint John (N.B.) 128.5 128.0 127.5 126.9
Saguenay (Que.) 160.0 160.3 160.4 160.0
Québec (Que.) 785.2 793.6 800.9 806.4
Sherbrooke (Que.) 207.5 210.1 212.6 214.5
Trois-Rivières (Que.) 154.4 155.1 156.0 156.4
Montréal (Que.) 3,937.4 3,985.1 4,028.0 4,060.7
Ottawa-Gatineau (Ont.-Que.) 1,288.5 1,302.9 1,316.5 1,332.0
Kingston (Ont.) 165.9 167.1 168.5 169.9
Peterborough (Ont.)1 122.7 123.1 122.8 122.6
Oshawa (Ont.) 373.8 379.1 384.0 389.0
Toronto (Ont.) 5,868.7 5,966.4 6,053.4 6,129.9
Hamilton (Ont.) 750.7 758.3 765.2 771.7
St. Catharines-Niagara (Ont.) 404.0 405.2 406.8 408.2
Kitchener-Cambridge-Waterloo (Ont.) 498.8 503.1 507.3 511.3
Brantford (Ont.)1 140.4 141.8 142.8 143.9
Guelph (Ont.)1 148.0 149.5 151.3 153.0
London (Ont.) 494.4 498.7 502.7 506.4
Windsor (Ont.) 330.8 332.5 334.3 335.8
Barrie (Ont.)1 195.4 198.0 200.3 202.7
Greater Sudbury (Ont.) 165.5 165.7 165.3 164.8
Thunder Bay (Ont.) 125.1 125.2 124.9 124.7
Winnipeg (Man.) 759.6 770.3 782.6 793.4
Regina (Sask.) 225.0 231.3 237.0 241.4
Saskatoon (Sask.) 281.4 291.0 298.9 305.0
Calgary (Alta.) 1,307.5 1,357.8 1,406.0 1,439.8
Edmonton (Alta.) 1,241.8 1,286.0 1,331.6 1,363.3
Kelowna (B.C.)1 185.6 187.8 191.2 197.3
Abbotsford-Mission (B.C.) 176.7 178.5 181.0 183.5
Vancouver (B.C.) 2,408.1 2,438.7 2,475.7 2,504.3
Victoria (B.C.) 355.2 357.6 361.4 365.3

Calgary

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Winnipeg

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Demographics in Manitoba

culture

The majority of Manitoba’s population (73 per cent) identifies English as their mother tongue, according to the 2011 Census. Other prevalent first languages are German (6 per cent), French (4 per cent), Tagalog (3 per cent), Cree (2 per cent) and Ukrainian (1 per cent).

According to the 2011 National Household Survey, about 72 per cent of Manitoba’s population is of European ethnic origin. Among this group, those who claim British Isle ancestry are the largest, followed by German, Ukrainian and French. Since the establishment of the New Iceland settlement on the western shore of Lake Winnipeg in 1875, Manitoba has also had a relatively large population with Icelandic origins (about 3 per cent). Those of Indigenous origin, including First Nations, Méti and a small number of Inuit, comprise roughly 17 per cent of the population. The province is also home to a large number of persons of Filipino and Chinese origins (5 per cent and 2 per cent respectively), concentrated primarily in Winnipeg.

The Canadian Museum for Human Rights Museum in downtown Winnipeg. July 3, 2012  (BORIS MINKEVICH / WINNIPEG FREE PRESS)

List of Manitoba’s 10 Largest Cities

Name Population
Winnipeg 663,617
Brandon 46,061
Springfield 14,069
Hanover 14,026
Steinbach 13,524
Thompson 13,123
Portage la Prairie 12,996
St. Andrews 11,875
Winkler 10,670
St. Clements 10,505

 

Population since 1871

1871 25,228
1881 62,260
1891 152,506
1901 255,211
1911 461,394
1921 610,118
1931 700,139
1941 729,744
1951 776,541
1956 850,040
1961 921,686
1966 963,066
1971 988,245
1976 1,021,505
1981 1,026,241
1986 1,063,015
1991 1,091,942
1996 1,113,898
2001 1,119,583
2006 1,148,401
2011 1,208,268