The Flying Rays

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Mobula is a genus of ray in the family Myliobatidae (eagle rays). Their appearance is similar to that of manta rays, which are in the same family. Species of this genera are often collectively referred to as “flying mobula” or simply “flying rays”, due to their propensity for breaching, sometimes in a spectacular manner. The devil fish can attain a disc width of up to 5.2 m (17 ft) and can probably weigh over a ton, second only to the Manta species in size. Despite their size, little is known about this genus, much of it being from anecdotal accounts.

 

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Top Secret movie ”cow/bull scenes”

Top Secret is a relatively unknown comedy film made in 1984.  It stars Val Kilmer in his first feature role.  In my humble opinion it is one of the funniest movies I have ever watched.  The film was made by the ZAZ trio,  David Zucker, Jim Abrahams and Jerry Zucker.  These fellows made Airplane and the Naked Gun series. 

The humour in Top Secret is very much the same as in those other movies.  Cornball jokes, misinterpretation amongst characters and cockamamie situations.  But there is one scene in Top Secret that should go down as one of the greatest humour sequences in film.  The “Cow Scene.”

 

 

A Real Battle of the Planet of the Apes

'Monkey Menace' Spawns Massive Protest

Wild monkeys have overrun a region of India and frustrated residents are taking to the streets demanding that the government put an end to the simian invasion.

Once quiet communities have been transformed into veritable warzones worthy of the Planet of the Apes films due to mobs of monkeys that are becoming increasingly brazen in their quest for food and territory.

The Indian city of Almora and an astounding 24 surrounding villages have been enveloped by the monkey menace in recent weeks, leading to mass protests about the problem.

“Monkeys have made our lives hell,” one exasperated protestor told the Hindustan Times, claiming that people cannot leave anything of value outside their home lest it be taken by the sticky-fingered simians.

Irate residents also say that their houses are being swarmed by the creatures, children are afraid to walk down the street alone, and people are staying inside their homes during the daytime to avoid running into the marauding monkeys.

While some may suspect that the furor over the monkeys is overblown, the stunning number of alleged attacks by the creatures suggest that is far from the case.

Organizers of the protest alleged that an area hospital has been treating a staggering ten people per day for monkey bites and that a similar number of daily incidents simply go unreported.

And so, with nowhere else to turn, over two hundred residents have committed to a two-week-long protest that they say will amplify into a hunger strike if the Indian government does not help them stop the monkeys.

Fortunately, there may be an unlikely solution in sight as the area has seen a recent uptick in leopard attacks which wildlife officials are also being asked to thwart.

Should the leopards set their sights on the simian surplus, the Almora area could finally find themselves free from their nightmare, although they’d eventually have to find a way to fend off the ferocious felines once they’re done feasting on monkeys.

Hindustan Times

Middle East Animal Wars

Hamas ‘seizes Israeli spy dolphin’ off Gaza

Hamas claims to have captured a dolphin being used as an Israeli spy off the coast of Gaza, local media report.

The militant Palestinian Islamist group, which dominates Gaza, says the mammal was equipped with spying devices, including cameras, according to the newspaper Al-Quds (in Arabic).

It was apparently discovered by a naval unit of Hamas’s military wing and brought ashore.  Al-Quds said that the newest recruit was “stripped of its will” and turned into “a murderer” by the Israeli security services.

It shows the extent of Israel’s “anger” and “indignation” at the formation of Hamas’s naval combat unit, the paper reports.

Israeli authorities have not commented on the media reports.

This photo was possibly released by Russian intelligence, apparently taken from a Russian mini-sub.

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The dolphin appears to have some type of massive camera harnessed to its back

It is not the first time that Israel has been accused of using animals – and birds – for spying purposes.

In 2010 Israel dismissed Egyptian claims that a series of shark attacks in the Red Sea could have been the result of a Mossad plot.

A few weeks later a vulture found in Saudi Arabia with a GPS transmitter was accused of being an unwitting Mossad operative.

And in 2012, villagers in Turkey feared a small migratory bird found dead with a ring on its leg had been an Israeli spy. Their fear proved unfounded.

 

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Israel controls most of Gaza’s borders, coastline and airspace

More animal wars:

A huge vulture detained in Lebanon on suspicion of spying for Israel has been returned home after UN peacekeepers intervened, Israeli officials said.

The bird, which has a 1.9m (6ft 5in) wing span, flew over the border from an Israeli game reserve and was caught by Lebanese villagers on Tuesday.

They became suspicious as the griffon vulture had a tracking device attached to its tail.

It is part of a conservation project to reintroduce raptors to the Middle East.

Wildlife officials say the vulture was brought from Spain last year and set free about a month ago in the Gamla Nature Reserve in the Israeli-occupied Golan Heights.

Tel Aviv University is involved in tracking the bird, and as well as a GPS transmitter, it had tags on its wings and an engraved metal ring on its leg saying: “Tel Aviv Univ Israel”.

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