Amazing dog with ridiculously long tongue breaks world record

An incredible canine with a ridiculously long tongue has entered the Guinness World Record books.

Mochi “Mo” Rickert, an eight-year-old St. Bernard from Sioux Falls, South Dakota, has set a new record with a tongue measuring a whopping 18.58 cm (7.31 in) in length.

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Her owner says she is regularly stopped in the street by strangers keen to grab a photo with the slobbery pet.

“It still does not seem real! Mochi is so humble, she never brags or boasts but I know that she is as proud of her new record as we are,” said her owner Carla Rickert.

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“It feels truly amazing to be a part of the Guinness World Records: Amazing Animals book!  We are so grateful for the opportunity to make others smile.”

She adopted Mochi, who she describes as “a resilient, happy-go-lucky dog, with a big personality” from a rescue organisation six years ago.

Mo enjoys dressing up in costumes, having her picture taken, spending time with her family, or snacking on sweet potatoes, she added.

However, being a record breaker comes with its own unique challenges, with Mochi facing some breathing difficulties and sometimes needing help to pick things up off the floor.

Craig Glenday, editor-in-chief of Guinness World Records: Amazing Animals, said he was “very excited” about Mochi entering the book.

 

Scary Killer Rabbit Movie just doesn’t work because the Rabbits are just too cute

The bunnies have faces that are totally disarming. They do not look like terror creatures. Too cuddly.

Night of the Lepus, also known as Rabbits, is a 1972 American science fiction horror film based on the 1964 science fiction novel The Year of the Angry Rabbit.

Released theatrically on October 4, 1972, it focuses on members of a small Arizona town who battle thousands of mutated, carnivorous killer rabbits. The film was the first science fiction work for producer A. C. Lyles and for director William F. Claxton, both of whom came from Western film backgrounds. Character actors from Westerns the pair had worked on were brought in to star in the Night of the Lepus, including Stuart Whitman, Janet Leigh, Rory Calhoun, and DeForest Kelley.

Shot in Arizona, Night of the Lepus used domestic rabbits filmed against miniature models and actors dressed in rabbit costumes for the attack scenes.

 

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Before its release, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer (MGM) renamed the film from its original name of Rabbits and avoided including rabbits in most promotional materials to try to keep the featured mutant creatures a secret. However, the studio itself broke the secret by issuing rabbit’s foot-themed promotional materials before the release. Widely panned by critics for its premise, bad directing, stilted acting and laughable special effects, the film’s biggest failure was considered to be the inability to make the rabbits seem scary. Night of the Lepus has gained cult status for its poor quality and was released to home video for the first time in October 2005 when it was released to Region 1 DVD. It has been featured in Rifftrax, the comedy troupe of Mike Nelson, Kevin Murphy and Bill Corbett, former members of the Mystery Science Theater 3000 ensemble.

 

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Flying Stingrays

 

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Mobula is a genus of ray in the family Myliobatidae (eagle rays). Their appearance is similar to that of manta rays, which are in the same family. Species of this genera are often collectively referred to as “flying mobula” or simply “flying rays”, due to their propensity for breaching, sometimes in a spectacular manner. The devil fish can attain a disc width of up to 5.2 m (17 ft) and can probably weigh over a ton, second only to the Manta species in size. Despite their size, little is known about this genus, much of it being from anecdotal accounts.

 

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