Langur Monkeys Orange Babies

The François’ langur, also known as the Francois’ leaf monkey, Tonkin leaf monkey, or white side-burned black langur is a species of lutung and the type species of its species group. It is one of the least studied of the species belonging to the Colobinae subfamily.

The species is distributed from Southwestern China to northeastern Vietnam. The total number of wild individuals is unknown, but fewer than 500 are believed to be left in Vietnam and 1,400–1,650 in China. About 60 langurs are in captivity in North American zoos. The species is named after Auguste François (1857–1935), who was the French Consul at Lungchow in southern China.

Infants are born with bright orange coloured fur, which fades to black throughout the period of infancy lasting several months. It isn’t known why their coats are so conspicuous, but current hypotheses suggest it may elicit attention, protection and caregiving by adults.

 

 

Rubjerg Knude: The Lighthouse Buried in Sand

Rubjerg Knude Lighthouse is an abandoned lighthouse located on the coast of the North Sea in Rubjerg, in northern Denmark. The light in Rubjerg Knude Lighthouse was lit for the first time the December, 27, 1900. The lighthouse was built on the coastal slope’s highest point 60 meters above sea level and a good 200 meters inland.

The lighthouse tower is 23 meters high, and when it was built there were no large dunes around it. But with time the sea moved in closer and the wind blew large amounts of sand up from the cliff. The sand piled up in front of and around the lighthouse, filled the well and ruined the kitchen gardens.

To suppress the sand pine grates were set in and lyme grass and helmet was planted in the dune, but the efforts went vain as the sand dune continued to grow. At last the sand was so high that at times it was impossible to see the light from the sea. On August 1, 1968 the struggle was given up and the lighthouse was lit for the last time.

Since then the lighthouse has become a popular visitor attraction on the Jutland coast. For a number of years, the buildings were used as a museum and coffee shop, but continually shifting sands caused them to be abandoned as well in 2002. It’s predicted that the lighthouse will fall into the sea in 15 to 20 years time.

rubjerg-knude-lighthouse-8

rubjerg-knude-lighthouse-9

 

rubjerg-knude-lighthouse-1

 

rubjerg-knude-lighthouse-2

 

rubjerg-knude-lighthouse-3

 

rubjerg-knude-lighthouse-4

 

rubjerg-knude-lighthouse-5

 

rubjerg-knude-lighthouse-10

 

California County Debates Resolution to Protect Bigfoot

In a bizarre bit of local politics, the supervisors of a county in California recently had a lengthy debate over whether or not to pass a resolution that would punish any individuals who purposely kill a Bigfoot. The strange matter came up during an otherwise routine meeting of the Trinity County Board of Supervisors last week. Alongside mundane governmental issues such as increasing the animal control budget and awarding a liquor license to an area restaurant was an eyebrow-raising proposal aimed at protecting Sasquatch.

Specifically, the resolution argued that “there is evidence to indicate the possible existence in Trinity County of a nocturnal primate mammal variously described as an ape-like creature or a subspecies of Homo sapien” colloquially known as Sasquatch, Yeti, Bigfoot, or “Giant Hairy Ape.” Noting that the purported presence of this creature in the region has not only drawn interest from researchers, but also gun-toting individuals looking to take down the beast, the bill called for “any premeditated, willful and wanton slaying of Bigfoot” to be punishable by a fine of up to $1,000 and/or imprisonment in the county jail for a period of one year.

Political junkies who are also paranormal enthusiasts will be delighted to know that the actual meeting in which the Trinity County Board of Supervisors debated the issue was broadcast on YouTube. The surprisingly long and decidedly amusing conversation can be seen in the video above. It begins with board member Bobbi Chadwick, who put forward the proposal, reading the resolution to her colleagues and then opening up the floor to questions or comments. After a somewhat uncomfortable spell of silence, fellow board member Keith Groves laughingly asks “why is this on the agenda?”

In response, Chadwick explains that there is “enthusiasm regarding the Bigfoot” throughout the county and that the purpose of the resolution is “to help facilitate the well being of this creature, we don’t want anyone hunting or shooting” Sasquatch. Groves’ concerns about the unorthodox nature of the proposal were echoed by another board member, John Fenley, who told the group that he had “received quite a few emails” from irritated constituents wondering “what the heck is going on with all of this” and groused that “I got beat up.”

Despite the pushback from her colleagues on the board, Chadwick posited that there were possible educational and tourism-related benefits to the bill. Fenley simply responds, “I get it, but my constituents just…” before bursting into laughter. Following some positive comments from members of the public who attended the meeting, the final debate over the proposal takes a surprisingly heated turn when Groves declares that, rather than being hilarious, “I actually find the resolution to be insulting” as it “encourages laxity in the use of firearms.”

“I’m not sure if we’re trying to be funny or if we’re trying to be serious or what we’re trying to do here,” Groves says with an air of exasperation, “we have spent more time on this than we should.” A few moments later, he somewhat dramatically spins around in his chair as if to say that he is finished discussing the matter. Ultimately, the nearly 20-minute-long debate concludes with a majority of the board agreeing to table the resolution so that it can be resubmitted as some kind of proclamation rather than an actual law.

Jimmy Dean

Jimmy Ray Dean (August 10, 1928 – June 13, 2010) was an American country music singer, television host, actor, and businessman.

He rose to fame for his 1961 country music crossover hit into rock and roll with “Big Bad John”.

His acting career included appearing in the early seasons in the Daniel Boone TV series as the sidekick of the famous frontiersman played by star Fess Parker. Later he was on the big screen in a supporting role as billionaire Willard Whyte in the James Bond movie Diamonds Are Forever (1971).

The Las Vegas Center for Brain Health

Mind-Bending Design

 

brain

 

The Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health (LRCBH), officially the Cleveland Clinic Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health, opened on May 21, 2010 in Las Vegas, Nevada that is operated by the Cleveland Clinic and was designed by the world-renowned architect Frank Gehry.

 

brain1

 

Keep Memory Alive (also known as KMA) was founded by Larry Ruvo, senior managing partner of Southern Wines and Spirits, in memory of his father, Lou Ruvo, a victim of Alzheimer’s Disease, together with his wife Camille, Mirage Resorts CEO Bobby Baldwin (who also lost his father to Alzheimer’s Disease), and Bobby Baldwin’s wife Donna. KMA supports the mission of the Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health and has held several star-studded galas, attended by celebrities and notables from around the world.

It has become one of Las Vegas’ most important charity initiatives and a key participant in the nation fight against Alzheimer’s disease. Since its inception, the event has raised more than $20 million towards achieving its goal – the realization of the Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health. Funds committed by such supporters as the Spector Family Foundation, the Roland and Terri Sturm Foundation, Steinberg Diagnostics, the Hard Rock Hotel and Casino and America Online will be utilized for the construction and operation of this state-of-the-art facility.

The Center is planned to become a national resource for the most current research and scientific information for the treatment of Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s, Huntington ‘s Diseases, Multiple Sclerosis and ALS (Lou Gehrig’s Disease) as well as focusing on prevention, early detection and education.

 

brain2

 

The ceremonial groundbreaking of the Lou Ruvo Center for Brain Health occurred on February 9, 2007.

The Center operates as an outpatient treatment and research facility in downtown Las Vegas on land deeded to Keep Memory Alive, the fund raising arm of LRCBH, by the City of Las Vegas as part of its 61 acres (25 ha) Symphony Park.

The Center is approximately 65,000 sq ft (6,000 m2) and includes 13 examination rooms, offices for health care practitioners and researchers, a “Museum of the Mind,” and a community auditorium. The Center will also serve as the headquarters for Keep Memory Alive, the Las Vegas Alzheimer’s Association and the Las Vegas Parkinson’s Disease Association.

 

brain3

 

The research center for degenerative brain diseases is divided into two separate buildings connected by a courtyard. The first forms a jumble of swooping stainless-steel arcs and houses events spaces to rent. The second contains clinics and research facilities dedicated to preserving memory, and consists of white stacked boxes.

 

brain8

 

brain5

 

brain6

 

brain7