‘Creepy’ Magazine Covers

 

Creepy was an American horror-comics magazine launched by Warren Publishing in 1964. Like Mad, it was a black-and-white newsstand publication in a magazine format and did not carry the seal of the Comics Code Authority. An anthology magazine, it initially was published quarterly but later went bimonthly. Each issue’s stories were introduced by the host character, Uncle Creepy. Its sister publications were Eerie and Vampirella.

 

 

 

Cultural Legacy

The back cover of Roger Taylor’s (drummer of rock band Queen) solo project album Fun in Space shows him reading the July 1980 issue of Creepy. The album’s front cover flips the image, showing the alien from that issue reading a magazine about Roger Taylor.

In 2010, New Comic Company, LLC signed a deal with mask company Trick or Treat Studios to release the first officially licensed Uncle Creepy mask in almost 20 years. The mask was sculpted by Trick or Treat Studios Art Director Justin Mabry and will be available in Halloween and costumes stores across the world for the 2011 Halloween season.

By September 2012, the apparel company Stüssy launched a line of T-shirts and hats titled “Stüssy x Creepy” featuring Uncle Creepy, the Creepy logo and graphics from the magazines.

An issue of creepy is visible on the second panel of the first page of The Immortal Hulk Issue 30.

 

 

 

 

 

Publication date: Late 1964 to 1983, 2009 – 2016.

Talented Artist Creates Beautiful Artworks with Hundreds of Strips of Paper

Bekah Stonefox is a 45-year-old artist from the UK who specializes in creating intricate works of art with hundreds of colorful strips of paper.

The talented artist has been honing her quilling skills for the last five years, and has put together quite the impressive collection of artworks, from detailed portraits of imaginary human characters, to animals like dogs, cats and even gorillas. Bekah’s most remarkable skill is using various quilling techniques to depict various textures, like the fur on mammals, the feathers on birds, or the skin of reptiles. It almost seems like there is nothing she can’t recreate from tiny bits of paper.

While many quilling artist use multiple techniques in their artworks, Bekah Stonefox relies only on the on-edge technique to make her creations look as realistic as possible.

 

While you’re here, you may want to take a look at the works of Danny Schleibe, the creator of a unique art form called “tapigami”, which uses vinyl masking tape instead of rolled bits of paper.

Photos © Bekah Stonefox