Another Classic Movie Scene

Black Dynamite versus Richard Nixon.

Black Dynamite is a 2009 American blaxploitation action comedy film starring Michael Jai White, Tommy Davidson, and Salli Richardson. The film was directed by Scott Sanders and co-written by White, Sanders, and Byron Minns, who also co-stars.

The plot centers on former CIA agent Black Dynamite, who must avenge his brother’s death while cleaning the streets of a new drug that is ravaging the community. The film is a parody of and homage to the blaxploitation genre and its era. It had a trailer and funding even before a script was written. Black Dynamite was shot in 20 days in Super 16 format. The film was released in the United States on October 16, 2009, for only two weeks (with an “official” premiere at the Toronto After Dark film festival) and was well received by critics. It was released on home video on February 16, 2010.

Why Do Fools Fall in Love?

 

Franklin Joseph Lymon (September 30, 1942 – February 27, 1968) was an American rock and roll/rhythm and blues singer and songwriter, best known as the boy soprano lead singer of the New York City-based early rock and roll group The Teenagers. The group was composed of five boys, all in their early to mid-teens. The original lineup of the Teenagers, an integrated group, included three African-American members, Frankie Lymon, Jimmy Merchant, and Sherman Garnes; and two Puerto Rican members, Joe Negroni and Herman Santiago. The Teenagers’ first single, 1956’s “Why Do Fools Fall in Love,” was also their biggest hit. After Lymon went solo in mid-1957, both his career and that of the Teenagers fell into decline. He was found dead at the age of 25 on the floor of his grandmother’s bathroom from a heroin overdose. His life was dramatized in the 1998 film Why Do Fools Fall In Love.

Bad Aussie Spiders

This is a very bad bastard.

The Sydney funnel-web spider (Atrax robustus) is a species of venomous mygalomorph spider native to eastern Australia, usually found within a 100 km (62 mi) radius of Sydney. It is a member of a group of spiders known as Australian funnel-web spiders. Its bite is capable of causing serious illness or death in humans if left untreated.

The Sydney funnel-web has a body length ranging from 1 to 5 cm (0.4 to 2 in). Both sexes are glossy and darkly coloured, ranging from blue-black, to black, to shades of brown or dark-plum coloured.

The Sydney funnel-web is medium to large in size, with body length ranging from 1 to 5 cm (0.4 to 2 in). Both sexes are glossy and darkly coloured, ranging from blue-black, to black, to brown or dark-plum coloured. The carapace covering the cephalothorax is almost hairless and appears smooth and glossy. Another characteristic are finger-like spinnerets at the end of their abdomen. The shorter-lived male is smaller than the female, but longer-legged. The average leg length for the spider in general is six to seven centimeters.

Distribution is centred on Sydney, extending north to the Central Coast and south to the Illawarra region, and west to the Blue Mountains in New South Wales.

The spider can be found in moist microhabitats, including under logs and foliage.

Sydney funnel-web spiders are mostly terrestrial spiders, favouring habitats with moist sand and clays.

Sydney funnel-web spider venom contains a compound known as δ-atracotoxin, an ion channel inhibitor, which makes the venom highly toxic for humans and other primates. However, it does not affect the nervous system of other mammals. These spiders typically deliver a full envenomation when they bite, often striking repeatedly, due to their defensiveness and large chitinous cheliceral fangs. There has been no reported case of severe envenoming by female Sydney funnel-web spiders, which is consistent with the finding that the venom of female specimens is less potent than the venom of their male counterparts. In the case of severe envenomation, the time to onset of symptoms is less than one hour, with a study about Sydney funnel-web spider bites finding a median time of 28 minutes. This same study revealed that children are at particular risk of severe Sydney funnel-web spider envenoming, with 42% of all cases of severe envenoming being children.

There is at least one recorded case of a small child dying within 15 minutes of a bite from a funnel-web.

The bite of a Sydney funnel-web is initially very painful, with clear fang marks separated by several millimetres. The size of fangs is responsible for the initial pain. In some cases the spider will remain attached until dislodged by shaking or flicking it off. Physical symptoms can include copious secretion of saliva, muscular twitching and breathing difficulty, disorientation and confusion, leading to unconsciousness.

A Sydney funnel-web bite is regarded as a medical emergency requiring immediate hospital treatment. Current guidelines for antivenom recommend two vials, or four vials if symptoms of envenomation are severe. Patients are assessed every 15 minutes, with further vials recommended if symptoms do not resolve. The most vials used to treat a bite is 12. The patient was a 10-year-old boy who was bitten in February 2017 by a male Sydney funnel-web that was hiding in a shoe.

The antivenom was developed by a team headed by Struan Sutherland at the Commonwealth Serum Laboratories in Melbourne. Since the antivenom became available in 1981, there have been no recorded fatalities from Sydney funnel-web spider bites. In September 2012, it was reported that stocks of antivenom were running low, and members of the public were asked to catch the spiders so that they could be milked for their venom. One dose of antivenom requires around 70 milkings from a Sydney funnel-web spider.

The Australian Reptile Park receives Sydney funnel-web spiders as part of its milking program. In January 2016, they received a male Sydney funnel-web with a 10-centimetre (4 in) leg span. The spider was described by the park as the largest specimen that it had ever seen.

The Jukebox

jukebox2

In San Francisco in 1890, Louis Glass and William S. Arnold invented the nickel-in-the-slot phonograph, the first of which was an Edison Class M Electric Phonograph retrofitted with a device patented under the name of Coin Actuated Attachment for Phonograph. The music was heard via one of four listening tubes.

Early designs, upon receiving a coin, unlocked the mechanism, allowing the listener to turn a crank that simultaneously wound the spring motor and placed the reproducer’s stylus in the starting groove. Frequently, exhibitors would equip many of these machines with listening tubes (acoustic headphones) and array them in “phonograph parlors”, allowing the patron to select between multiple records, each played on its own machine. Some machines even contained carousels and other mechanisms for playing multiple records. Most machines were capable of holding only one musical selection, the automation coming from the ability to play that one selection at will. In 1918 Hobart C. Niblack patented an apparatus that automatically changed records, leading to one of the first selective jukeboxes being introduced in 1927 by the Automated Musical Instrument Company, later known as AMI.

 

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The term jukebox came into use in the United States beginning in 1940, apparently derived from the familiar usage “juke joint”, derived from the Gullah word “juke” or “joog” meaning disorderly, rowdy, or wicked. As it applies to the ‘use of a jukebox’, the terms juking (v.) and juker (n.) are the correct expressions.

Song-popularity counters told the owner of the machine the number of times each record was played (A and B side were generally not distinguished), with the result that popular records remained, while lesser-played songs could be replaced.

Wallboxes were an important, and profitable, part of any jukebox installation. Serving as a remote control, they enabled patrons to select tunes from their table or booth. One example is the Seeburg 3W1, introduced in 1949 as companion to the 100-selection Model M100A jukebox. Stereo sound became popular in the early 1960s, and wallboxes of the era were designed with built-in speakers to provide patrons a sample of this latest technology.

 

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Jukeboxes were most popular from the 1940s through the mid-1960s, particularly during the 1950s. By the middle of the 1940s, three-quarters of the records produced in America went into jukeboxes. While often associated with early rock and roll music, their popularity extends back much earlier, including classical music, opera and the swing music era. In 1977, The Kinks recorded a song called “Jukebox Music” for their album Sleepwalker.

Many manufacturers produced jukeboxes, including 1890s Wurlitzer, 1920s Seeburg, 1930s “Rock-Ola” whose name is actually based on that of the company founder, David Cullen Rockola, Sound Leisure and Crosley.

Two companies still remain today in the manufacture of classically styled jukeboxes. Rockola based in California and Sound Leisure based in Leeds in the UK. Both companies manufacture jukeboxes based on a CD playing mechanism however in April 2016 Sound Leisure showed a prototype of the “Vinyl Rocket” at the UK Classic Car Show. It stated that it would start production of the 140 7″ vinyl selector (70records) in summer of the same year.

 

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1952 Seeburg M100C – This was the jukebox exterior used in the credit sequences for the sitcom Happy Days in seasons 1-10. It played up to fifty 45 rpm records making it a 100-play. It was a very colorful jukebox with chrome glass tubes on the front, mirrors in the display, and rotating animation in the pilasters.

 

jukex

Self-Described ‘Trans Satanist Anarchist’ Wins Republican Nomination for County Sheriff

Aria DiMezzo, a self-described “transsexual Satanist anarchist” who ran for the sheriff’s job in Cheshire County, New Hampshire, with the campaign slogan “F*** the Police”, decisively won the Republican nomination this weekend.

DiMezzo said that she had expected to lose to a write-in candidate, adding that her surprising victory proves “the system is utterly and hopelessly broken”. She went on to explain that any system that a system that allows thousands of people to walk into a voting booth and vote despite not knowing anything about the person they are nominating for the most powerful law-enforcement position in the county is undoubtedly broken. The young GOP nominee claims that she has always been upfront about who and what she is, but that the very fact that she won shows just how “clueless the average voter is”.

“So you’re mad. I get it,” Aria DiMezzo wrote in a blog post on her campaign website, addressing the hate mail she’s been receiving since she received the GOP nomination. “Your anger is with the system that has lied to you. Your anger is with the system that convinced you to believe in it, trust it, and have faith in it, when it is completely and utterly broken.”

“I’m running for sheriff because I oppose that very system, and the sheriff has the most hands-on ability in Cheshire County to oppose that system,” she said. “The system that let you down by allowing me — the freaking transsexual Satanist anarchist — be your sheriff candidate is the same system I’m attacking. I’m sorry, and I know it hurts to hear, but that system is a lie. The entire thing is a lie. It’s broken from beginning to end, and my existence as your sheriff candidate is merely how this reality was thrown into your face.”

Marilyn Huston, the chair of the Cheshire County GOP, told Inside Sources that DiMezzo “did very well with the primary and that was wonderful,” but added that the unlikely Republican nominee never showed up to GOP meetings and events, despite being invited. To be fair, doing so would have done her campaign more harm than good…

Aria DiMezzo got 4,211 votes, easily beating her traditional GOP opponent, who only managed to garner a few hundred votes. She will now be running against popular incumbent Democrat Eli Rivera, who is seeking a fifth term as Cheshire County sheriff.

Even if she doesn’t win, I think it’s safe to say that DiMezzo got her point across very clearly. If this doesn’t make people understand that the electoral system in the US is broken, nothing will.

“Sweet Satan, how can you not be an anarchist?!” the GOP nominee wrote in her blog post. “Between 75 and 80 percent of the primary voters — the ones alleged to be more politically aware than the average voter — were completely and totally ignorant of who they were voting for! What is the percentage with the average voter? 90 percent? 95 percent? These people are deciding who gets to rule you!”

 

Viral ‘UFO’ Over New Jersey Revealed to be Goodyear Blimp

An odd UFO that was spotted by several New Jersey residents and sparked something of an ‘alien panic’ on social media has been identified as being merely the Goodyear Blimp. The weird ‘mass sighting’ reportedly occurred on Monday evening when numerous people living in the northern part of the state noticed a curious object hovering in the sky near a major highway. The sight was apparently so strange that multiple motorists stopped their cars to watch the puzzling aerial interloper and numerous people pulled out their cameras to film the oval-shaped which seemed to sport a glowing base.

Social media was soon flooded with footage of the suspected alien craft with many of the videos garnered hundreds-of-thousands and, in one case, millions of views. Unsurprisingly, given the staggering nature of what the witnesses thought they were seeing, most of the accounts were peppered with profanities and concerns about an ET invasion about to unfold. Fortunately, it did not take long before cooler heads prevailed and it was determined that, in fact, the ‘mothership’ was actually the Goodyear Blimp headed over to MetLife Stadium for Monday Night Football.

People have to be careful when they see something strange in the sky. 90 percent of the time there is an Earthly explanation. It is the other 10 percent that is so mysterious and intriguing.

Vintage Orange Crush Memorabilia

When I was around 13 or 14 years old the soft drink Orange Crush became my favourite. I just loved it. But after a couple years I switched over to Cream Soda, then Mountain Dew, on to Pepsi before landing up with Coke as the favourite. It was a tasty ride.

Orange Crush had some really cool bottles back in the 50’s and 60’s.  They were referred to as “Krinkly Bottles.”

 

 

Today the Crush brand comes in a wide variety of flavours. From pineapple and grapefruit to watermelon.

Canned Laughter

Even 1960s cartoons such as The Flintstones and The Jetsons used laugh tracks.

 

Charley Douglass didn’t like the laughter he was hearing.

The sound engineer, who was working at CBS in the early days of television, hated that the studio audiences on the US TV channel’s shows laughed at the wrong moments, didn’t laugh at the right moments, or laughed too loudly or for too long. So he took a page from radio producers before him who had pioneered the use of recorded laughter, most notably when Bing Crosby began pre-recording his show – which allowed his engineers to add or subtract the laughs in post-production.

The idea of ‘the laugh track’ spread quickly through the new medium—and caused immediate controversy that would last until modern times. Actor and producer David Niven sniffed in a 1955 interview, “The laugh track is the single greatest affront to public intelligence I know of, and it will never be foisted on any audience of a show I have some say about.” But TV producers remained wed to the idea of providing some sort of audience reaction to make the viewing experience more communal; after all, audiences were still largely used to enjoying their entertainment via live performance or in the cinema, both of which provided fellow laughers. The industry’s ambivalence toward the practice was best summed up in a cursory Billboard magazine item in 1955: “TV production chief Babe Unger hates canned laugh tracks, but thinks audience reaction is necessary for The Eddie Cantor Comedy Theater because TV viewers expect an audience to be there.”

Seinfeld is one of the most cutting-edge sitcoms of all time, but it too had canned laughter despite looking more like a single-camera show (Credit: NBC)

Seinfeld is one of the most cutting-edge sitcoms of all time, but it too had canned laughter despite looking more like a single-camera show (Credit: NBC)

Breaking Bad as a Sitcom with canned laughter.