The Saar Loop at Mettlach

The Saar River rises in the Vosges mountains on the border of Alsace and Lorraine, in France, then flows northward through western Germany to its confluence with Mosel river, near Trier. Within Germany the Saar River pursues a winding course until it reaches a barrier in the form of Hunsrück, a low mountain range made of hard quartzite rock. Quartzite is a hard, metamorphic rock which was originally sandstone. Sandstone is converted into quartzite through heating and pressure usually related to tectonic compression. The river, unable to carve a way through the rocks, makes a full 180-degree turn and cuts a deep U-shaped gorge through the thickly wooded mountains. This remarkable hairpin bend located above Mettlach is called the Saar Loop or Saarschleife in German, and is one of the most famous sights of Saarland. The river flows parallel for a long stretch in the opposite direction before turning left and continuing its northward journey towards Mosel river.

saarschleife-7

saarschleife-6

saarschleife-8

saarschleife-10

saarschleife-5

 

Astronauts Snapped Hurricane Florence Photos From The ISS, And They’re Truly Chilling

Alexander Gerst, a German astronaut orbiting Earth from 250 miles (402 kilometres) up, has a warning for humans on the planet below him.

“Watch out, America!” Gerst, who joined the crew of the International Space Station in June, said Wednesday in a tweet featuring pictures he took of Hurricane Florence.

hurricane1

Because of its enormous size and power, the storm has been a recent – if not frightening – muse for astronaut photography.

Here are some of the best images of Hurricane Florence by Gerst and Ricky Arnold, a fellow NASA astronaut living aboard the ISS.

Gerst said Hurricane Florence was so enormous, with a width of more than 500 miles (804 kilometres), that he “could only capture her with a super wide-angle lens.”

hurricane2

hurricane3

The Eye

hurricane4

hurricane5

hurricane6

hurricane7

hurricane8

Glass Bottle Church

The late Bob Cain built a series of glass bottle structures on his farm just north of town. In 2007 these structures were moved into the community of Treherne, Manitoba. The exterior of some structures are visible from outside the grounds when the attraction is closed.

bottles (2)

bottles (3)

Wishing Well

bottles (4)

bottles (5)

bottles (6)

bottles (7)

bottles (8)

bottles (9)

bottles (1)