I Thought Orange Crush only had One Flavor

Wow, was I mistaken.

Flavors

A 12oz Crush strawberry soda
Crush Apple
Crush Banana
Crush Berry Blast
Crush Berry Punch
Crush Berry Pomegranate
Crush Birch Beer (Newfoundland, also available at some Sobeys grocery chains across Canada)
Crush Blue Raspberry
Crush Bubblegum (Slush only)
Crush Cherry (2009–)
Crush Chocolate
Crush Cola (Kuwait, 1970s–1990s)
Crush Cream Soda (Canada and UK); sold clear in Québec, and Newfoundland and Labrador; sold pink in the rest of Canada
Crush Frozen Orange Dream
Crush Tropical Punch
Crush Fruity Red
Crush Ginger Beer
Crush Grapefruit
Crush Grape
Crush Lemon
Crush Lemonade
Crush Lemon-Lime
Crush Lime
Crush Lime Rickey
Crush Nectar
Crush Orange
Crush Orange Dry
Crush Peach
Crush Peach Sour
Crush Pear
Crush Pineapple (Originally sold only in Newfoundland)
Crush Pink Grapefruit
Crush Red Cream
Crush Red Licorice
Crush Root Beer
Crush Sarsi
Crush Soda Water (Kuwait, 1970s–1990s)
Crush Sour Apple (briefly offered in 2005)
Crush Spruce Beer
Crush Strawberries ‘n’ Cream
Crush Strawberry
Crush Strawberry Lemonade
Crush Tuti-Fruti
Crush Wild Cherry Cola
Crush Watermelon
Diet Crush Apple
Diet Crush Cream Soda
Diet Crush Grape
Diet Crush Lime
Orange Crush Light (in Chile)
Diet Crush Orange

Crush is a brand of carbonated soft drinks owned and marketed internationally by Keurig Dr Pepper, originally created as an orange soda, Orange Crush. Crush mainly competes with Coca-Cola’s Fanta, and Sunkist. It was created in 1911 by beverage and extract chemist Neil C. Ward. Most flavors of Crush are caffeine-free.

Bottles were originally ribbed and at one point made of brown glass.

Joey Chestnut just keeps rapidly slamming back those hot dogs

Joseph Christian Chestnut (born November 25, 1983) is an American competitive eater. He is currently ranked first in the world by Major League Eating. He is a Vallejo, California, native and resides in Westfield, Indiana. Chestnut’s height is 6 ft 0 in (1.83 m); his weight is 230 pounds (100 kg).

On July 4, 2007, Chestnut won the 92nd Annual Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest, beating six-time defending champion Takeru “Tsunami” Kobayashi by consuming a world record 66 hot dogs and buns (HDB) in 12 minutes, after losing to Kobayashi in 2005 and 2006. The following year, he successfully defended his title by winning a five hot dog eat-off after tying Kobayashi in consuming 59 HDB in ten minutes. On July 4, 2009, Chestnut beat Kobayashi again, by consuming a world record 68 HDB and winning his third consecutive title. On July 4, 2010, Chestnut took home his 4th consecutive Mustard Belt eating 54 HDB. The 2010 contest was a runaway victory, as Kobayashi did not compete due to a contract dispute with Major League Eating. On July 4, 2011, he won his fifth-consecutive championship with 62 HDB. 2012 marked his sixth consecutive win, when Chestnut tied his own world record from 2009 by devouring 68 HDB. In 2013, Chestnut captured his seventh straight title, eating a total of 69 HDB, breaking his previous world record. In 2014, Chestnut captured his eighth straight title eating a total of 61 HDB.

Chestnut lost the 2015 Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest to Matt Stonie. On July 4, 2016, Chestnut regained the championship belt from Stonie by eating 70 hot dogs; 3.5 hot dogs short of his record-setting qualifying round. A year later on July 4, 2017, he raised the bar again by raising his record to 72 hot dogs; and again the following year to a world record of 74. In 2019, he secured a twelfth title with 71 HDB, but failed to beat his previous record. In 2020, he consumed 75 HDB, a world record for the contest. In 2021, he consumed 76 HDB, breaking his own world record for the contest.

Chestnut, a San Jose State University student, entered the competitive eating scene in 2005 with a break-out performance in the deep-fried asparagus eating championship, in which he beat high-ranked eater Rich LeFevre by eating 6.3 pounds (2.9 kg) of asparagus in 11.5 minutes. That same year, during Nathan’s Hot Dog Eating Contest, he ate 32 HDB, placing third behind Takeru Kobayashi and Sonya Thomas.

On October 22, 2005, Chestnut set a new world record for downing 32.5 grilled cheese sandwiches in ten minutes at the Arizona State Fair, as part of the GoldenPalace.net World Grilled Cheese Eating Championship circuit.

Chestnut defeated Thomas in the Waffle House World Waffle Eating Championship and placed second to her in a Krystal Square Off World Hamburger Eating Championship qualifier, eating 56 Krystal Burgers in eight minutes to her 57. He later beat her by eating 91 hamburgers in the finals, finishing second to the 97 hamburgers consumed by Kobayashi.

Chestnut trains by fasting and by stretching his stomach with milk, water and protein supplements. Since the start of his competitive eating career, his competition weight has varied from 225–240 pounds (102–109 kg). After winning his sixth consecutive hot dog eating contest in 2012 by eating 68 hot dogs, he stated, “I will not stop until I reach 70. This sport isn’t about eating. It’s about drive and dedication, and at the end of the day, hot dog eating challenges both my body and my mind.” He says he trains for hot dog eating competitions by cooking hot dogs at his house and then eating them in a simulated competition style. He starts with 40 hot dogs and then works his way up until he is in game shape. He compared it to running or lifting weights for other athletes.

This is not exactly a classic sports moment.

Vintage Orange Crush Memorabilia

When I was around 13 or 14 years old the soft drink Orange Crush became my favourite. I just loved it. But after a couple years I switched over to Cream Soda, then Mountain Dew, on to Pepsi before landing up with Coke as the favourite. It was a tasty ride.

Orange Crush had some really cool bottles back in the 50’s and 60’s.  They were referred to as “Krinkly Bottles.”

 

 

Today the Crush brand comes in a wide variety of flavours. From pineapple and grapefruit to watermelon.

Cool Hotdog Cars

“Wienermobile” is a series of automobiles shaped like a hot dog on a bun which are used to promote and advertise Oscar Mayer products in the United States. The first version was created in 1936 by Oscar Mayer’s nephew, Carl G. Mayer, and variants are still used by the Oscar Mayer company today. Drivers of the Wienermobiles are known as Hotdoggers and often hand out toy whistles shaped as replicas of the Wienermobile, known as Wienerwhistles.

Wienermobile_OURDOG_plate

wiener2

The Oscar Mayer Wienermobile has evolved from Carl Mayer’s original 1936 vehicle to the vehicles seen on the road today. Although fuel rationing kept the Wienermobile off the road during World War II, in the 1950s Oscar Mayer and the Gerstenslager Company created several new vehicles using a Dodge chassis or a Willys Jeep chassis. One of these models is on display at the Henry Ford Museum in Dearborn, Michigan. These Wienermobiles were piloted by “Little Oscar” (portrayed by George Molchan) who would visit stores, schools, orphanages, and children’s hospitals and participate in parades and festivals.
In 1969, new Wienermobiles were built on a Chevrolet motor home chassis and featured Ford Thunderbird taillights. The 1969 vehicle was the first Wienermobile to travel outside the United States. In 1976 Plastic Products, Inc., built a fiberglass and styrofoam model, again on a Chevrolet motor home chassis.
In 1988, Oscar Mayer launched its Hotdogger program, where recent college graduates were hired to drive the Wienermobile through various parts of the nation and abroad. Using a converted Chevrolet van chassis, Stevens Automotive Corporation and noted industrial designer Brooks Stevens built a fleet of six Wienermobiles for the new team of Hotdoggers.
With the 1995 version, the Wienermobile grew in size to 27 feet long and 11 feet high. The 2004 version of the Wienermobile includes a voice-activated GPS navigation device, an audio center with a wireless microphone, a horn that plays the Wiener Jingle in 21 different genres from Cajun to Rap to Bossa Nova, according to American Eats, and sports fourth generation Pontiac Firebird taillights.

wienermobile1

Wienermobile-NAIAS-2005

Wienermobile-2

There are currently eight active Wienermobiles, six of which are the full-sized familiar models (the other two are the Mini and the food truck versions) with each assigned a part of the country. The “hotdogger” position of driving the Wienermobile is open to U.S. citizens, and the job lasts from the first of June until the following first of June. Only college seniors who are about to graduate are eligible. Both current hotdoggers and Oscar Mayer recruiters visit college campuses across the country in search of the next round of hotdoggers. Candidates are screened from an average of 2000 applicants. Every March, a pool of thirty final-round candidates are brought to Kraft Foods and Oscar Mayer headquarters in Madison, Wisconsin, for interviews. Each vehicle can hold two hotdoggers, and twelve people are chosen. Currently there are about 300 hotdogger alumni.

wiener1

wiener3

They apparently come in all sizes.