Way-out Giorgio Tsoukalos

Giorgio A. Tsoukalos (born March 14, 1978) is a Swiss-born Greek-Austrian writer and television personality (a regular on Ancient Aliens). He is a proponent of the idea that ancient alien astronauts interacted with ancient humans. He is the Chairman and co-founder of Legendary Times magazine, which features articles from Erich von Däniken, David Hatcher Childress, Peter Fiebag, Robert Bauval, and Luc Bürgin on the topic of ancient astronauts and related subject matter.

Tsoukalos is the director of Erich von Däniken’s Center for Ancient Astronaut Research (the A.A.S. R.A.—Archaeology, Astronautics and SETI Research Association), and has appeared on The Travel Channel, The History Channel, the Sci-Fi Channel, the National Geographic Channel, as well as Coast to Coast AM, and is a consulting producer of the television series Ancient Aliens.

Tsoukalos is a 1998 graduate of Ithaca College in Ithaca, New York, with a bachelor’s degree in sports information and communication. For several years in the early 2000s, before he made ancient astronaut research his primary career, he served as a bodybuilding promoter in IFBB sanctioned contests, including Mr. Olympia. He is fluent in English, Greek, German, French, Italian, Vulcan and Andromedan.

 

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Giorgio and his cohort Erich von Daniken refer to themselves as Ancient Astronaut theorists. With a degree in sports communications I guess that isn’t that much of a leap. They base all their theories, and they try to make people believe these theories, on wishful thinking, conjecture, guesses and assumptions.  They put forward absolutely no hard evidence whatsoever.

Yet people buy into this bunk allowing these guys to make hundreds of thousands of dollars from TV shows and books etc. People will believe anything at anytime.

 

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Illogical and nonsensical arguments through and through.

 

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Giorgio appeared on a show about the Loch Ness Monster.  His theory was that Nessie was transported from an Alien world to the Scottish lake by an Alien time-travel machine. Okay.

 

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Where will the transformation end?

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Star Wars Nerd Designs Flags for 100 Planets in the Star Wars Universe

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If you were to tally every planet ever mentioned in Star Wars—we’re talking movies, comics, video games, and animated series—you’d end up with a number north of 300. That Star Wars became the cultural phenomenon we know today is no doubt the result of its dedication to truly thorough world-building. Every planet in the universe comes with its own history, culture, and landscape. And now, they have flags, too.

Scott Kelly is an art director from New Zealand who’s spent the last year designing flags for more than 100 planets in the Star Wars galaxy. As a self-professed Star Wars and flag-design nerd, Kelly drew on information from Wookieepedia to craft the brilliantly detailed emblems. He followed vexillological traditions to design his flags—think cantons, chevron patterns, and the classic 2:3 aspect ratio—and combined it with graphics that duly represented the otherworldliness of the series. “I tried to walk the line between traditional flag design and these far-off alien planets,” he explains.

 

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Every flag in the series is inspired by the culture, economy, history, and natural landscape of the fictional world it stands for. Tatooine’s flag, for example, is a deep red and yellow, which references the fact that travelers had long mistaken the planet for a sun because of its desert landscape (the two circles, of course, represent the two suns around which Tatooine orbits); while that of Thule, a planet in the outer rim territories known for its semi-arid savannah and rocks charred from lightening strikes, is more graphically aggressive. “It needed to have a quite masculine feel to it,” he explains. “Almost oppressive.”

 

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Naturally, Kelly took some creative liberties. For instance, he deciding that planets associated with the Galactic Republic would be colored royal blue. Other flags were simply Kelly’s interpretation of specific traditions and histories. He figures not everyone will agree with his vision (Star Wars fans are a tough crowd!), but regardless, you have to applaud his dedication. “There’s been a series of emails and replies that have said, ‘Oh I bet that guy doesn’t have a girlfriend,’” he laughs.

 

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