Toronto’s Millionaires Row

The Bridle Path is an upscale residential neighbourhood in the former city of North York, now part of Toronto, Ontario, Canada, that is characterized by large multi-million dollar mansions and two to four acre (8,000 to 16,000 m²) lot sizes. It is often referred to as “Millionaires’ Row”. It is the most affluent neighbourhood in Canada with an average household income of $936,137,[1] as well as by property values with an average dwelling value of $2.24M.

Although “The Bridle Path” is in fact the name of a road in the area, the term generally applies to the neighbourhood as a whole. It is bounded by The Bridle Path on the north, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre on the south, Bayview Avenue on the west and Wilket Creek on the east. Few roads pass through the area, contributing to the area’s exclusivity. House prices in the Bridle Path are varied, but they are mostly well in excess of a million dollars. It is a secluded neighbourhood, surrounded by the Don River Valley and lush parklands.

 

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Mansion under construction

 

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The Bridle Path has been home to prominent Toronto business people, celebrities and doctors. Media mogul Moses Znaimer used to call the Bridle Path home, while computer businessman Robert Herjavec, former newspaper baron and convicted businessman Conrad Black still own homes in the Bridle Path area. “Casino King of Macau” Stanley Ho owns a High Point Road home purchased in 1987 for a record $5.5 million and currently worth C$27 million.

 

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There are rooms in these giant houses that the owners won’t even enter for months at a time.

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Super Cool Sphere Arena in Stockholm

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Ericsson Globe (originally known as Stockholm Globe Arena, commonly referred to in Swedish simply as Globen (The Globe) is an indoor arena located in Stockholm Globe City, Johanneshov district of Stockholm, Sweden.

The Ericsson Globe is the largest hemispherical building on Earth and took two and a half years to build. Shaped like a large white ball, it has a diameter of 110 meters (361 feet) and an inner height of 85 meters (279 feet). The volume of the building is 605,000 cubic meters (21,188,800 cubic feet). It has a seating capacity of 16,000 spectators for shows and concerts, and 13,850 for ice hockey.

It represents the Sun in the Sweden Solar System, the world’s largest scale model of the Solar System.

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Globen was inaugurated on 19 February 1989 after a construction period of less than three years. The first major sporting event was the 1989 World Ice Hockey Championships.

On February 2, 2009, the naming rights to the Stockholm Globe Arena were officially acquired by Swedish telecommunications company Ericsson, and it became known as the Ericsson Globe.

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SkyView is the world-class attraction that takes you to the top of the world’s largest spherical building, the Ericsson Globe, a Stockholm landmark.

From the apex 130 meters (425 feet) above sea level, you get a fantastic view encompassing all of Stockholm. The two SkyView gondolas depart every 10 minutes, and the entire visit takes about 30 minutes. Restaurant, café, and souvenir shop are adjacent to SkyView.

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Fifth Floor: Highway Off Ramp

Gate Tower Building  is a 16 floor office building in Fukushima-ku, Osaka, Japan. It is notable for the highway off ramp at Umeda Exit that passes through the building.

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The building has a double core construction, with a circular cross section. The Umeda Exit of the Ikeda Route of the Hanshin Expressway system (when exiting the highway from the direction of Ikeda) passes between the fifth through seventh floors of this building. The highway is the tenant of those floors. The elevator passes through the floors without stopping, floor 4 being followed by floor 8. The floors through which the highway passes consist of elevators, stairways and machinery. The highway does not make contact with the building. It passes through as a bridge, held up by supports next to the building. The highway is surrounded by a structure to protect the building from noise and vibration. The roof has a helipad.

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osaka, japan