Spaceball One: An Amazing Spaceship

Spaceballs is a 1987 American science fiction parody film co-written, produced and directed by Mel Brooks. Starring Brooks, Bill Pullman, John Candy, and Rick Moranis, the film also features Daphne Zuniga, Dick Van Patten, and the voice of Joan Rivers. In addition to Brooks in a supporting role, the film also features Brooks regulars Dom DeLuise and Rudy De Luca in cameo appearances.

002_spaceballs_blu-ray

Lord Dark Helmet

The film was released by Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer on June 24, 1987, and was met with a mixed reception. It has since become a cult classic on video and one of Brooks’s most popular films. Its setting and characters parody the original Star Wars trilogy, as well as other sci-fi franchises including Star Trek, Alien, and the Planet of the Apes films.

One of the best parts of this movie is Spaceball One. A giant spaceship attack platform. It’s big, very big.

specbell

11,000 meters long

spaceball_one_ortho_by_unusualsuspex-d73mfg8

The original model.

­

This item is the massive 17 ft version model of the Spaceball One ship created for the 1987 Mel Brooks’ Star Wars comedy spoof Spaceballs. The model is constructed of styrene and resin, and detailed with kit bashed model parts. It features fiber optic lighting throughout. Spaceballs spoofs much of the design of Star Wars, and this ship is a spoof based of the Empire Star Destroyer. The effects work was done by Apogee Inc., company headed by John Dykstra that split off from ILM in 1978. Thus, Spaceballs marked the first time since Star Wars that the two units shared work on a single project, as Industrial Light and Magic was hired to create the puppet of the chest-burster for Spaceballs. On this movie the Chief Model Makers were Grant McCune, Chris Ross, David Beasley, Cory Faucher, Jay Roth, John Eaves, Tom Pahk, David Sosalla, Suzy Schneider, and Smokey Stover. The Model Department Special Design was run by Rae Burkland, Ron Thornton.

spaceballs
spaceball_845x485p

Wheels on Meals: a Movie with a Completely Nonsensical Title

Wheels on Meals is a 1984 Hong Kong martial arts action-comedy film written and directed by Sammo Hung, with action choreographed by Jackie Chan. The film stars Jackie Chan, Sammo Hung, Yuen Biao, Lola Forner, Benny Urquidez and José Sancho. The film was shot in Barcelona, Spain.

The film was a box office success in East Asia, including Japan where the film was released as Spartan X. The film was well-received by critics for its action and comedy, particularly the final fight between Jackie Chan and Benny Urquidez, which is considered one of the greatest fight scenes of all time. Jackie Chan with his stunt team were nominated for Best Action Choreography, for both Wheels on Meals and Project A, at the 4th Hong Kong Film Awards, winning the award for Project A.

Plot:

Thomas and David are cousins who run a fast food van in Barcelona. The food is delivered by Thomas, who rushes around the square on a skateboard. After fending off a biker gang they continue business as normal.

They pay a visit to David’s father, who is in a mental institution, and bump into Sylvia, the daughter of David’s father’s girlfriend. Thomas encourages his cousin to try to ask her out on a date, but David chickens out of this, making the excuse she would have said no anyway.

Later that night, while at the van serving food, Thomas inadvertently bumps into Sylvia, who is pretending to be a prostitute. She is actually a pickpocket, and she robs a man in a bedroom and runs away to their fast food van.

Both Thomas and David are enamored by her, but after allowing her to stay in their apartment that night, they wake to find Sylvia and their money gone. The next day, they bump into Moby, a bumbling private investigator who is also tracking Sylvia. They later discover that Sylvia is the heir to a sizable inheritance that a criminal gang is trying to steal from her. When she is kidnapped, Thomas, David and Moby team up to save her, infiltrating the villains’ castle and defeating them in a martial arts battle. The final scene of the film shows David, Thomas and Sylvia reunited. Sylvia asks for a summer job, and Moby asks David and Thomas if they wish to work as private detectives with him, which they refuse.

The film was distributed by Golden Harvest, a distribution, production and exhibition company based in Hong Kong.

Now for that very odd title:

The film’s title was supposed to be Meals on Wheels. Superstitious Golden Harvest executives however demanded the title change because their two previous films with titles that began with the letter ‘M’ – Megaforce and Menage A Trois – were both box office flops.

Wheels on Meals

Planet of the Sharks

I missed this one, it played during Shark Week last summer. Sounds like a bombastic blockbusting blast of blood and mayhem. Short plot blurb, polar ice caps melt and the world is just ocean, due to some aberration, there are no fish for the sharks to eat, they must feed on surface dwellers. Basically Waterworld meets Jaws.

shark1
shark

The original Planet of the… Movie. Planet of the Apes!

apeswww
apes6

Another honourable mention Shark Movie:

sharks11111

1960’s Beach Party Movies

beach

Beach party movies were an American subgenre of feature films produced and released between 1963 and 1968, created by American International Pictures (AIP), beginning with their surprise hit, Beach Party in July 1963. With this film, AIP is credited with creating the genre. In addition to the AIP films, several contributions to the genre were produced and released by major and independent studios alike. According to various sources, the genre comprises over 30 films, with the lower-budget AIP films being the most profitable.

Generally comedies, the core elements of the AIP films consisted of a group of teenage and/or college-age characters as heroes; non-parental adult characters as villains and/or comic relief; simple, silly storylines that avoided any sober social consciousness; teen trends and interests (such as dancing, surfing, drag racing, custom cars, etc.); simple romantic arcs, original songs (presented in both the “Musical” genre style and as ”source music”); teen-oriented musical acts (frequently performing as themselves); and a tongue-in-cheek attitude toward the target audience.

The earliest films by AIP, as well as those by other studios, focused on surfing and beach culture. Although the genre is termed “beach party film”, several subsequent films that appeared later in the genre, while keeping most of the core elements mentioned above, do not actually include surfing—or even scenes on a beach.

beach3

The complete AIP series

American International Pictures produced a series of twelve films that fall into the genre. With the exception of Sergeant Deadhead, Fireball 500 and Thunder Alley, all were related by recurring characters. For example, much of the cast in Bikini Beach appear in the follow-up Pajama Party, albeit with different names – however, biker Erich von Zipper appears in the film, along with his gang of “Rats,” playing the same characters as in two previous films. In addition, Ski Party would appear unrelated, except that the characters of Todd and Craig also appear in the later Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine, which is also linked to How to Stuff a Wild Bikini by the appearance of Erich von Zipper and Annette Funicello.

The only film not to have an appearance of some kind by either Avalon or Funicello is The Ghost in the Invisible Bikini (early promos for the film had announced that the two would appear, but it didn’t happen); Funicello does not appear in Avalon’s Sergeant Deadhead and Avalon does not appear in Funicello’s Thunder Alley.

FilmRelease dateDirectorWriter(s)Score
Beach Party7 August 1963William AsherLou Rusoff, William Asher, Robert DillonLes Baxter
Bikini Beach22 July 1964William AsherWilliam Asher, Robert Dillon, Leo TownsendLes Baxter
Pajama Party11 November 1964Don WeisLouis M. HeywardLes Baxter
Beach Blanket Bingo14 April 1965William AsherLeo Townsend, Sher Townsend, William AsherLes Baxter
Ski Party30 June 1965Alan RafkinRobert KaufmanGuy Hemric & Jerry Styner
How to Stuff a Wild Bikini14 July 1965William AsherWilliam Asher, Leo TownsendLes Baxter
Sergeant Deadhead18 August 1965Norman TaurogLouis M. HeywardLes Baxter
Dr. Goldfoot and the Bikini Machine6 November 1965Norman TaurogJames Hartford, Robert KaufmanLes Baxter
Ghost in the Invisible Bikini6 April 1966Don WeisLouis M. Heyward, Elwood UllmanLes Baxter
Fireball 5007 June 1966William AsherWilliam Asher, Leo Townsend, Burt TopperLes Baxter
Thunder Alley22 March 1967Richard RushSy SalkowitzMike Curb
beach7

Buster Keaton!

Bikini Beach - Lobby Card

A few offshoot films.

beach6
beach2
beach4

Some Maximum Crazy B Horror Movies Featuring Extremely Bizarre Creatures

Some movie producers sit around the backyard pool in L.A. and think up the damndest things. In the movies below these damndest things are horrible hybrid killing monstrosities. Some of these movies are so whacked out they are actually funny. Of course plenty of gratuitous gore to satisfy Quentin Tarantino types.

If you are not a horror movie fan this post may not be for you.

Conan O’Brien makes a fatal cameo in this one.

Watch Scene from ‘Pulp Fiction’

Pulp Fiction is a 1994 American neo-noir black comedy crime film written and directed by Quentin Tarantino, who conceived it with Roger Avary. Starring John Travolta, Samuel L. Jackson, Bruce Willis, Tim Roth, Ving Rhames, and Uma Thurman, it tells several stories of criminal Los Angeles. The title refers to the pulp magazines and hardboiled crime novels popular during the mid-20th century, known for their graphic violence and punchy dialogue.

One of the Worst Movies Ever Made

Robot Monster (or Monster from Mars) is a 1953 independently made American black-and-white 3D science-fiction film, remembered in later decades as one of the worst movies ever made. It was produced and directed by Phil Tucker, written by Wyott Ordung, and stars George Nader, Claudia Barrett, and George Barrows. The production company was Three Dimension Pictures, Inc. The film was distributed by Astor Pictures.

Robot Monster tells the story of the alien robot Ro-Man’s mission to Earth to destroy humanity. He manages to kill all but eight survivors, who have become immune to his death ray. Ro-Man runs afoul of the Great Guidance, his leader, when he becomes attracted to the human Alice. She is the eldest daughter of a surviving scientist, and he refuses to harm her. The Great Guidance must now come to Earth and finish what the Moon robot started.

The Long Bridge in ‘True Lies’ Arnie Schwarzenegger movie

True lies was one of the Terminator’s better movies. Especially if you are a fighter jet buff. The Marine Corps Harrier jet scenes were really cool. But in the movie what was that awesome bridge? Well it is described below.

Scenes from the movie:

The Harriers moving in to attack the terrorists

lies1

The Harriers evade anti-aircraft missiles fired by the terrorists

lies2

The terrorists are on their way to fornicate with the virgins and drink free wine in Muslim Martyr heaven. Not to mention play some cards with Osama Bin Laden and watch porn movies.

lies

More on the bridge

The Seven Mile Bridge is an iconic bridge in the Florida Keys of United States, stretching out into the open sea, connecting Knight’s Key in the Middle Keys to Little Duck Key in the Lower Keys. At the time of its completion in 1982, it was the longest continuous concrete segmental bridge in the world, and is currently one of the longest bridges in America.

Seven Mile Bridge actually consist of two bridges in the same location. The older bridge, originally known as the Knights Key-Pigeon Key-Moser Channel-Pacet Channel Bridge, was constructed from 1909-1912 as part of the Overseas Railroad. After the railroad sustained considerable damage during the Labor Day Hurricane of 1935, the bridge was refurbished for automobile use only. Dismantled tracks was recycled, painted white, and used as guardrails. It had a swing span that opened to allow passage of boat traffic, near where the bridge crosses Pigeon Key – a small island that once served as the work camp for the Florida East Coast Railway. When Hurricane Donna in 1960 inflicted further damage, decision to construct a new bridge was made.

lies5

A new, wider and sturdier Seven Mile Bridge was built right next to it from 1978 to 1982. When that happened, the original Seven Mile Bridge was nudged out of Florida’s transportation system. The vast majority of the original bridge still exists, used as fishing piers and access to Pigeon Key, but the swing span over the Moser Channel of the Intracoastal Waterway has been removed.

The total length of the new bridge is just under seven miles at 6.79 miles (10.93 km), and is shorter than the original. Each April the bridge is closed for approximately 2.5 hours on a Saturday and a “fun run,” known as the Seven Mile Bridge Run, of 1,500 runners is held commemorating the Florida Keys bridge rebuilding project. The event began in 1982 to commemorate the completion of a federally funded bridge building program that replaced spans that oil tycoon Henry Flagler constructed in the early 1900s to serve as a foundation for his Overseas Railroad.

The old bridge is still a popular spot with both locals and tourists, but it’s slowly falling apart. Salt water and storms are eroding the bridge faster than the state can afford to repair it. Much of the bridge is now closed – only a 2.2 mile section of the Old Seven Bridge is still open to pedestrians and cyclists.

Two years ago, a nonprofit community group called “Friends of Old Seven” was formed to try to preserve, and if possible, repair the bridge. The Florida Department of Transportation, which owns the bridge, cannot afford to sink a lot of money into the bridge’s upkeep, but is still willing to donate half of the $18 to $20 million required to repair the bridge. The community is now working hard to put up the other half.

lies6
lies7
lies8
lies9
lies10
lies11
bridge