Sleeper movie Sculptured House


The Woody Allen 1973 film Sleeper was on the tube the other day.  The movie is quite funny and interesting in terms of its science fiction angle.  The futuristic cars were sensational.  But what really attracted my attention was the strange curved house.  Something to behold.

When architect Charles Deaton designed the “Sculptured House” on Genesee Mountain just outside Denver in Colorado, he had definite ideas about its unique design.
“People aren’t angular. So why should they live in rectangles?” he said.

There’s no way anyone could confuse this house with the rectangular homes of the 1960s. The 7,500-square-foot home is three levels and curves unpredictably. It was designed as a sculpture first; the floor plan for the home was drawn up later (thus it was given the name, “Sculptured House”).

The Deaton-designed house was built in 1963. Delzell Inc. was the original builder of the house on an experimental permit, Clifford M Delzell was owner operator of Delzell Inc.

The interior of the Sculptured House went largely unfinished and was vacant for almost three decades until entrepreneur and one-time Denver, Colorado economic-development chief John Huggins purchased the house in 1999.  He built a large addition designed by Deaton with Nick Antonopolous before Deaton’s death in 1996, and commissioned Deaton’s daughter, Charlee Deaton, to design the interior, completed in 2003.

In 2006, fellow Denver entrepreneur Michael Dunahay purchased the house from Huggins.  By late 2010, Dunahay had become delinquent on the nearly $2.8 million outstanding balance of his $3.1 million mortgage on the house, and the Public Trustee in Jefferson County, Colorado scheduled a foreclosure auction for November 10, 2010.  The house was sold again in November 2010.

Woody Allen released Sleeper 37 years ago, and it’s still one of his top-ten grossing films. It generated about $18 million in sales at the time, but when that figure is adjusted for inflation, it grossed about $52.5 million, making it Woody Allen’s fifth most financially successful film. Sleeper famously ended with the line: “Sex and death: two things that come once in a lifetime. But at least after death you’re not nauseous.”

Diamonds are Forever, Jill St.John

Diamonds Are Forever is a 1971 spy film, the seventh in the James Bond series produced by Eon Productions. It is the sixth and final Eon film to star Sean Connery, who returned to the role as the fictional MI6 agent James Bond, having declined to reprise the role in On Her Majesty’s Secret Service (1969).

Tiffany Case is a fictional character in the 1956 James Bond novel Diamonds Are Forever and its 1971 film adaptation. A “Bond girl”, she was portrayed by Jill St. John in the film. In the novel, the story of her name is that when she was born, her father Case was so embittered she was not a boy that he gave her mother a thousand dollars and a powder case from Tiffany’s and walked out. In the film it is stated that she was named after her accidental preterm birthplace, Tiffany & Co., where her parents were going through a choice of wedding bands, to which Bond dryly jokes that she was lucky that it had not happened at Van Cleef & Arpels.

Scottish actor Sean Connery lies in bed kissing American actor Jill St. John in a Las Vegas hotel room in a still from the film, ‘Diamonds Are Forever,’ directed by Guy Hamilton, 1971. (Photo by United Artists/Fotos International/Courtesy of Getty Images)

27B-6

Brazil is a 1985 dystopian science fiction film directed by Terry Gilliam and written by Gilliam, Charles McKeown, and Tom Stoppard. The film stars Jonathan Pryce and features Robert De Niro, Kim Greist, Michael Palin, Katherine Helmond, Bob Hoskins, and Ian Holm.

The form 27B-6 has to be filled out before work can be done by repairmen of the Department of Public Works.

Modern Times

Modern Times is a 1936 American silent comedy film written and directed by Charlie Chaplin in which his iconic Little Tramp character struggles to survive in the modern, industrialized world. The film is a comment on the desperate employment and financial conditions many people faced during the Great Depression — conditions created, in Chaplin’s view, by the efficiencies of modern industrialization.

In 1989, Modern Times was one of the first 25 films selected by the Library of Congress for preservation in the United States National Film Registry for being “culturally, historically, or aesthetically significant”. Fourteen years later, it was screened “out of competition” at the 2003 Cannes Film Festival.

Charlie Chaplin at a War Bonds rally in Manhattan during World War II.