North Korea launches ballistic missile at North America

After doing some bad methamphetamine, Kim Jong Un and his brown nosing generals decide to hit the U.S. with their new long-range missile the KN-08. The intended target was either Los Angeles or San Francisco according to RAND Corporation analysts.

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The missile guidance system fails, as predicted by Stephen Colbert, and lands a thousand miles to the north. The missile and its nuclear warhead land in southern Alberta, Canada. Barley missing blowing up a herd of 10,000 black Angus cattle.

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It is time Canada gets on board with the U.S. anti-ballistic missile defense system.

“Birds Aren’t Real”

‘Birds Aren’t Real’: Whether comedy or conspiracy, the movement explains the post-truth era

'Birds Aren't Real': Whether comedy or conspiracy, the movement explains the post-truth era

via Birds Aren’t Real / Instagram

A lot of talking heads have remarked that we live in a post-truth era. In 2016, the Oxford Dictionary defined it as “Relating to or denoting circumstances in which objective facts are less influential in shaping public opinion than appeals to emotion and personal belief.”

Media bias, political microtargeting, social media, fake news websites, Donald Trump, and man’s innate desire to prefer being right over correct, have all unwillingly conspired to create a society where people cling to tribal beliefs, regardless of their validity.

This has resulted in a social milieu where conspiracy theories have become mainstream. Sure, they’ve always been around, but they seem to have recently graduated from the basement to the mainstream.

Open up Facebook and you’re sure to find a post from someone about QAnon, flat-Earth theory, pizzagate, faked moon landings, false-flag shootings, 9/11 truth, Bill Gates’ microchips, and Birds Aren’t Real.

Yep, Birds Aren’t Real is a thing. A pretty big one, too. Birds Aren’t Real has over 300,000 followers on Instagram and 66,000 on Twitter. Plus, there are local Birds Aren’t Real chapters sprouting up all over the U.S.

The theory postulates that in the ’50s, the CIA began killing off America’s bird population and replacing them with flying surveillance robots. Birds Aren’t Real estimates there are currently 12 billion birds watching us from above.

The group recently held a rally in the non-specific town of Springfield.

However, it’s pretty clear that Birds Aren’t Real isn’t an actual conspiracy theory. Rather, a piece of comedic performance art revealing how ridiculous ideas take hold in the post-truth era.

Its de facto leader Peter McIndoe won’t tell you that it’s a fake conspiracy, at least not overtly.

“That’s one of the saddest things, that people consider that this could be some sort of mass-improvisational performance, or some sort of showcasing, highlighting a new era we’ve entered into as a society where anything can be true,” he told Newsweek. “Even if [the movement being satirical] was the case, you really wouldn’t even be able to tell.”

He thinks that if it were a parody movement, it could help people cope with living in absurd times.

“I think if it were a parody movement, that might be a point it was trying to make, or maybe, allowing people to cope with those types of presences in our society in a way where you can come together and laugh about the absurdity of a post-truth era, because it’s a horrifying thing,” he said. “The thing is, we’re not that, though.”

While for many, the conspiracy theory is a way to shine a light on the ridiculous conspiracy theories corrupting society, McIndoe claims he isn’t stopping until all of the birds are culled from the sky.

“The end to this project would only exist in the case of societal acceptance and shutting down the 12 billion robot birds that currently swarm the skies of our nation,” McIndoe said, tongue planted firmly in cheek.

Ornery Hippo Chases Boat

A wild video from Zambia shows the terrifying moment when an ornery hippo set about chasing after a group of tourists on a sightseeing boat. The jaw-dropping footage, which came to light this week, was reportedly captured earlier this year on the Zambezi River in the town of Livingstone. In the video, a group of what may be juvenile hippos can be seen a short distance away from the boat in what initially seems like a rather serene glimpse of the majestic creatures.

However, the scene takes a troubling turn when the camera quickly pans a few feet away where a massive hippo has emerged from the water in hot pursuit of the vessel. The aggressive animal seemingly surprised the people on board as it was initially shockingly close to the boat. Fortunately, the person driving the boat smartly slams on the gas and keeps the hippo a relatively safe distance away, although the monstrous creature continues it chase the group for several seconds before finally throwing in the towel.

Nerves of Steel Very High Up

The CN Tower in Toronto has a very  scary attraction, a chance to show you are brave, or in my opinion a chance to just plain show-off and gloat about it to friends by walking around the edge of the tower. 

The tower’s EdgeWalk allows thrill-seekers to stroll outside on the world-famous tower on a 1.5 metre ledge that rings the main pod 356 metres (1,168 feet) above the ground.

Opened in 2011, this walk of wobbly knees sends groups of six to eight people out on the ledge where they walk hands-free while attached to an overhead safety harness.

During the walk, specially trained guides encourage visitors to push their personal limits, even allowing them to lean out 116 storeys above the city.

“Our facilities and engineering team supervised the EdgeWalk project design and build to ensure that it is both exciting and safe,” said CN Tower chief operating officer Jack Robinson in a news release.

“EdgeWalk is both thrilling and unique and pushes visitors to their limits — literally and figuratively,” said Mark Laroche, president and CEO of Canada Lands Company, which owns and operates the CN Tower. The entire EdgeWalk experience takes about 90 minutes, with the walk itself lasting between 20 to 30 minutes.

 

 

 

They give you a breathalyzer before the walk.  To make sure you are not under the influence of alcohol.  Well there goes my opportunity, I would not touch this Edgewalk unless I had gulped down at least 10 ounces of Canadian rye whiskey.

‘Creepy’ Magazine Covers

 

Creepy was an American horror-comics magazine launched by Warren Publishing in 1964. Like Mad, it was a black-and-white newsstand publication in a magazine format and did not carry the seal of the Comics Code Authority. An anthology magazine, it initially was published quarterly but later went bimonthly. Each issue’s stories were introduced by the host character, Uncle Creepy. Its sister publications were Eerie and Vampirella.

 

 

 

Cultural Legacy

The back cover of Roger Taylor’s (drummer of rock band Queen) solo project album Fun in Space shows him reading the July 1980 issue of Creepy. The album’s front cover flips the image, showing the alien from that issue reading a magazine about Roger Taylor.

In 2010, New Comic Company, LLC signed a deal with mask company Trick or Treat Studios to release the first officially licensed Uncle Creepy mask in almost 20 years. The mask was sculpted by Trick or Treat Studios Art Director Justin Mabry and will be available in Halloween and costumes stores across the world for the 2011 Halloween season.

By September 2012, the apparel company Stüssy launched a line of T-shirts and hats titled “Stüssy x Creepy” featuring Uncle Creepy, the Creepy logo and graphics from the magazines.

An issue of creepy is visible on the second panel of the first page of The Immortal Hulk Issue 30.

 

 

 

 

 

Publication date: Late 1964 to 1983, 2009 – 2016.