The Unbelievable Mysteries of Mount Shasta

Mount Shasta is a potentially active volcano at the southern end of the Cascade Range in Siskiyou County, California. At an elevation of 14,179 feet (4321.8 m), it is the second-highest peak in the Cascades and the fifth-highest in the state. Mount Shasta has an estimated volume of 85 cubic miles (350 km3), which makes it the most voluminous stratovolcano in the Cascade Volcanic Arc. The mountain and surrounding area are part of the Shasta–Trinity National Forest.

Mount Shasta is connected to its satellite cone of Shastina, and together they dominate the landscape. Shasta rises abruptly to tower nearly 10,000 feet (3,000 m) above its surroundings. On a clear winter day, the mountain can be seen from the floor of the Central Valley 140 miles (230 km) to the south. The mountain has attracted the attention of poets, authors, and presidents.

The mountain consists of four overlapping dormant volcanic cones that have built a complex shape, including the main summit and the prominent satellite cone of 12,330 ft (3,760 m) Shastina, which has a visibly conical form. If Shastina were a separate mountain, it would rank as the fourth-highest peak of the Cascade Range (after Mount Rainier, Rainier’s Liberty Cap, and Mount Shasta itself).

California’s Mount Shasta has been the subject of an unusually large number of myths and legends. In particular, it is often said to hide a secret city beneath its peaks. In some stories, the city is no longer inhabited, while in others, it is inhabited by a technologically advanced society of human beings or mythical creatures.

Mount Shasta can generate lenticular clouds, which may contribute to its supernatural reputation.

According to local indigenous tribes, namely the Klamath people, Mount Shasta is inhabited by the spirit chief Skell, who descended from heaven to the mountain’s summit. Skell fought with Spirit of the Below-World, Llao, who resided at Mount Mazama, by throwing hot rocks and lava, probably representing the volcanic eruptions at both mountains. Writer Joaquin Miller recorded various related legends in the 1870s.

Mount Shasta has also been a focus for non-Native American legends, centered on a hidden city (called Telos) of advanced beings from the lost continent of Lemuria. The legend grew from an offhand mention of Lemuria in the 1880s. In 1899, Frederick Spencer Oliver published A Dweller on Two Planets, which claimed that survivors from a sunken continent called Lemuria were living in or on Mount Shasta. Oliver’s Lemurians lived in a complex of tunnels beneath the mountain and occasionally were seen walking the surface dressed in white robes. In 1931, Harvey Spencer Lewis, using the pseudonym Wisar Spenle Cerve, wrote a book (published by the Rosicrucians) about the hidden Lemurians of Mount Shasta that a bibliography on Mount Shasta described as “responsible for the legend’s widespread popularity.” This belief has been incorporated into numerous occult religions, including “I AM” Activity, The Summit Lighthouse, Church Universal and Triumphant, and Kryon.

According to Guy Ballard, while hiking on Mount Shasta, he encountered a man who introduced himself as Count of St. Germain, who is said to have started Ballard on the path to discovering the teachings that would become the “I AM” Activity religious movement.

According to a legend, J. C. Brown was a British prospector who discovered a lost underground city beneath Mt. Shasta in 1904. Brown had been hired by the Lord Cowdray Mining Company of England to prospect for gold, and discovered a cave which sloped downward for 11 miles. In the cave, he found an underground village filled with gold, shields, and mummies, some being up to 10 feet tall.

Thirty years later, he told his story to John C. Root, who proceeded to gather an exploration team in Stockton, California. About 80 people joined the team, but on the day the team was to set out, Brown did not show up. Brown was not heard from again.

The 429 yard par 4 sninth hole at Mount Shasta Resort.

Mount Shasta is believed to be a home base for the Lizard People, too, reptilian humanoids that also reside underground. The mountain is a hotbed of UFO sightings, one of the most recent of which occurred in February 2020. (It was a saucer-shaped lenticular cloud.) In fact, the mountain is associated with so many otherworldly, paranormal, and mythical beings—in addition to long-established Native American traditions—that it’s almost like a who’s who of metaphysics. It has attracted a legion of followers over the years, including “Poet of the Sierras” Joaquin Miller and naturalist John Muir, as well as fringe religious organizations such as the Ascended Masters, who believe that they’re enlightened beings existing in higher dimensions. What is it about this mountain in particular that inspires so much belief?

Pluto’s Cave is a volcanic lava tube on the outskirts of Mount Shasta.

“There’s a lot about Mount Shasta, and volcanoes in general, that are difficult to explain,” says Andrew Calvert, scientist-in-charge at the California Volcano Observatory, “and when you’re having difficulty explaining something, you try and understand it.” Calvert has studied Shasta’s eruptive history since 2001. “It’s such a complicated and rich history,” he says, “and Shasta itself is also very visually powerful. These qualities build on each other to make it a profound place for a lot of people—geologists, spirituality seekers … even San Francisco tech folks, and hunters and gatherers from 10,000 years ago. It’s one that can have a really strong effect on your psyche.”

Taylor Tupper, a Modoc Indian of the Klamath Tribes, raised in the Klamath Basin just north of Shasta. Tupper says she leaves people to their own beliefs about Shasta as well: spiritual, metaphysical, or simply on another plane. “People always ask me about UFOs and such, and I say I’m not going to go poking around in others’ business. Every place you go is sacred or special to someone or something, or was at some point. Treat it all with respect and your spirit will be in tune with nature and the creator, and you won’t be going against spiritual law. If you are going against it, nature will let you know.”

Really Cool Globes

 

globex

 

globe2

 

globe6

 

globex1

 

globe7

 

globex2

 

globe8

 

globex3

 

globe12

Electro-magnetic levitating globe

 

globex4

 

globe16

Door Knob

 

globe15

Rich Arab from the UAE had this huge globe built that is actually a mobile camper.

 

globe18

Globe display in Boston

 

globe20

Huge rotating globe in the lobby of the Daily News building in New York City. It was used in a scene from the first Superman movie starring Christopher Reeve.

 

Rock and Water Paradise

Get a boat, and along with some friends, go exploring this rugged yet beautiful paradise would be one bloody good time.

 

Scenic aerial of Lake Powell and rock formations. MICHAEL MELFORD/National Geographic

Scenic aerial of Lake Powell and rock formations. MICHAEL MELFORD/National Geographic

 

Lake Powell is a reservoir on the Colorado River, straddling the border between Utah and Arizona (most of it, along with Rainbow Bridge, is in Utah). It is a major vacation spot that around 2 million people visit every year. It is the second largest man-made reservoir by maximum water capacity in the United States behind Lake Mead, storing 24,322,000 acre feet (3.0001×1010 m3) of water when full. Due to high water withdrawals for human and agricultural consumption, and because of subsequent droughts in the area, Lake Powell is currently the largest reservoir in the United States in terms of capacity of water currently held, depth and surface area. Lake Powell was created by the flooding of Glen Canyon by the Glen Canyon Dam, which also led to the creation of Glen Canyon National Recreation Area, a popular summer destination. The reservoir is named for explorer John Wesley Powell, a one-armed American Civil War veteran who explored the river via three wooden boats in 1869.

 

Lake_Powell_Map

 

lake powell1

 

lake powell3

 

Young Woman relexing in waterhole laying on air matress, Lake Powell, Utah

Young Woman relaxing in waterhole laying on air matress, Lake Powell, Utah

 

lake powell5

 

lake powell6

 

Lake_Powell_-_Arizona

 

lake powell8

 

lake powell9

 

Lake_Powell_-_Arizona11

 

Lake_Powell_original_1205

 

LakePowell3

 

Lake-Powell-Arizona-6

 

LakePowellHouseboatRentalsMedia9-800x600

 

Glen Canyon Dam

Glen_Canyon_Dam_Lake_Powell,_Arizona

 

Magical Ha Long Bay, Vietnam

Hạ Long Bay is a UNESCO World Heritage Site and popular travel destination in Quảng Ninh Province, Vietnam. Administratively, the bay belongs to Hạ Long City, Cẩm Phả town, and is a part of Vân Đồn District. The bay features thousands of limestone karsts and isles in various shapes and sizes. Hạ Long Bay is a center of a larger zone which includes Bái Tử Long Bay to the northeast, and Cát Bà Island to the southwest. These larger zones share a similar geological, geographical, geomorphological, climate and cultural characters.

Hạ Long Bay has an area of around 1,553 km2, including 1,960–2,000 islets, most of which are limestone. The core of the bay has an area of 334 km2 with a high density of 775 islets. The limestone in this bay has gone through 500 million years of formation in different conditions and environments. The evolution of the karst in this bay has taken 20 million years under the impact of the tropical wet climate. The geo-diversity of the environment in the area has created biodiversity, including a tropical evergreen biosystem, oceanic and sea shore biosystem. Hạ Long Bay is home to 14 endemic floral species and 60 endemic faunal species.

 

halong

 

halong3

 

ha-long-bay-map

 

halong1

 

halong2

 

wallup.net

halong4

halong7

ha-long-61-e1467707293594

ha-long-bay-16632

Footage for the movie Kong Skull Island was shot at Ha Long Bay.

kongskullislandposter

If desert landscapes appeal to you, this is the resort to check out

I have always had an attraction to the desert. It may have started by watching the Roadrunner cartoons as a kid. Every time I get into desert country I feel relaxed and find the scenery stunning. This Utah resort is on my bucket list.

A modernist marvel of architecture and design in the wild and wind-swept landscape surrounding Utah’s Lake Powell, Amangiri hotel is a clean-lined sandstone monument to luxury that blends into its stark and striking natural surroundings. The hotel’s centrepiece, a dramatic pool, is built around a jutting rock formation at the base of a mesa. It’s all very relaxing and decadent, with a Navajo-inspired spa, gourmet restaurant and absolutely perfect service.

 

amangiri_web

 

amangiri2

 

amangiri-2

 

amangiri3

 

amangiri4

 

amangiri0014

 

amangirirackbrochure2010_page_09_image_0001

 

amangiri-resort_16

 

amangiri-resort-the-style-junkies-awards-2015

 

amangiri-resort-utah_ag-via-ferrata-24

Butte crossing on a swinging bridge.

 

amangiri-resort-with-uninterrupted-splendid-desert-views

You want to quarantine safely, here is the perfect place.

Sea Fort in the Middle of The Gulf of Mexico

Fort Jefferson is a massive but unfinished coastal fortress. It is the largest brick masonry structure in the Americas, and is composed of over 16 million bricks. Among United States forts, only Fort Monroe in Virginia and Fort Adams in Rhode Island are larger. The fort is located on Garden Key in the lower Florida Keys within the Dry Tortugas National Park, about 70 miles (110 km) west of the island of Key West. The Dry Tortugas are part of Monroe County, Florida, United States.

Fort-Jefferson_Dry-Tortugas

The fort was built in 1861 and is located 90 miles west of Key West.  It’s now a national park.

It was built to maintain an American presence in the Gulf and to scare off pirates.  During the Civil War it was mainly a prison.  But it looks to me like it would be one great place to set up some tents, crack open the beer and let the festivities begin.

 

fortxx

 

 

 

 

fort jefferson

Gloomy Place Names

There are places stuck in perpetual despair, but only by name. A new Instagram account called Sad Topographies by Australian artist Damien Rudd is dedicated to showcasing these places.

“I initially came across a place in Australia … called Mount Hopeless. The name kind of caught me off guard and I decided to come back later and research it,” Damien Rudd told CBC.  “I actually found that there were many more places that had surprisingly depressing names. That kind of got me started on the project.”

 

name

 

name1

 

Many of these depressing place names are connected to the dark history of early colonialism, and the mishaps of explorers and settlers. Communities are hesitant to change the names of these places because of their historical context.

“I think once you become accustomed to a name, you don’t really hear it like an outsider would,” he says. “There’s a certain type of history that gets lost when you change names.”

Rudd finds these places by typing sad words into Google Maps.

 

name4

Starvation Heights, an unincorporated community in Jackson County, Oregon, was named before 1883 for its poor and infertile soil, a granite-like mix which supported only scrub vegetation.

 

name5

Killer Lake, Addington Highlands, Canada

 

name2

 

name3

Let’s stay happy out there.