The World’s Biggest House

Why one family would need a residence this big boggles the mind.  But when you have 2 billion dollars in the bank, creative spending is needed.  To build something like this in a city that has hundreds of thousands of homeless people doesn’t seem appropriate.  The building has approximately the same floor space as a 30 story office building.

Antilia is the name of a twenty-seven floor personal home in South Mumbai belonging to India’s richest man, businessman Mukesh Ambani, the billionaire Chairman of Reliance Industries.  There will be 600 full-time staff to maintain the residence, which is considered the most expensive home in the world with a price over US$ 1 billion dollars.  Its also been described as the “Taj Mahal of 21st century India”.

The home will house Ambani, wife Nita, their three children and Ambani’s mother.

Location Mumbai, Maharashtra, India
Status Completed
Constructed 2007-2010
Use Residential
Height
Roof 173 metres (568 ft)
Technical details
Floor count 27 (equivalent to 60 floors tower)
Cost US$50-70 million est. yearly maintenance
Companies involved
Architect(s) Perkins & Will

The structure was designed by U.S. architects using principles of Vaastu, Indian traditional geomancy akin to Chinese feng shui, to maximize “positive energy.” No two floor plans are alike, and the materials used in each level vary widely.

The home will include:

  • 400,000 sq feet of living space.
  • Parking space for 168 cars.
  • A one-floor vehicle maintenance facility.
  • 9 elevators in the lobby.
  • 3 helipads and an air traffic control facility.
  • Health spa, yoga studio, small theatre with a seating capacity for 50 on the eighth floor,  multiple swimming pools, three floors of hanging gardens, and a ballroom.
  • An ice room infused with man-made snow flurries.

 

Some Indians are proud of the “ostentatious house,” while others see it as “shameful in a nation where many children go hungry.”  Dipankar Gupta, a sociologist at New Delhi’s Jawaharlal Nehru University, opined that “such wealth can be inconceivable” not only in Mumbai, “home to some of Asia’s worst slums,” but also in a nation with 42 percent of the world’s underweight children younger than five.

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