Great National Geographic photos

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Elephant and Queleas, Tanzania

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Base jumping, Yosemite national park, California

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Water Buffalo India

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Great White checking out the shark cage

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Cheetahs in Kenya checking out the tourists

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Leopard (left) stealing a Cheetahs kill

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Elephants moving through the Serengeti

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Geladas monkeys Ethiopia

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Giraffes and Gazelles Namibia

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Child and buffalo in Vietnam

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Harvesting Kash flowers India

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Kyrgyz girls Afghanistan

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Mountain gorilla and baby

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Chicken farm Pennsylvania

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Climbing redwood trees in California

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Lions in the Serengeti

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Sleeping white lion South Africa

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Tigers India caught on trail cam

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Free rock climbing Yosemite California

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Lake Wakatipu New Zealand

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Lions chilling in Tanzania

La Bamba played like you have never seen before

Slipknot is an American heavy metal band from Des Moines, Iowa. The band was founded in September 1995 by percussionist Shawn Crahan and bassist Paul Gray.

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The band has said the idea of wearing masks stemmed from a clown mask that Crahan took to rehearsals when the band first started. Crahan later became known for his clown masks, adopting the pseudonym “Shawn the Clown”. The concept developed; by late 1997, the band decided every band member would wear a unique mask and matching jumpsuit. Taylor said in 2002, “it’s our way of becoming more intimate with the music. It’s a way for us to become unconscious of who we are and what we do outside of music. It’s a way for us to kind of crawl inside it and be able to use it.”

 

Very Cool Vintage TV’s

When televisions were still a luxury, high-tech item, designers wanted to make them look as crazily futuristic and beautiful as possible. Here are some of the most bizarre and breathtaking television sets that ever existed.

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Kuba Komet (1957-1962, Wolfenbuttel, West Germany)

 

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The sailboat-like ultra-heavy (it was 289 lb. or 130 kg) home entertainment system of its time had a 23″ black and white television, eight speakers, a Telefunken phonographs and a multi-band radio receiver. The Komet cost more than a year’s average wage.

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Marconiphone Television 702 with a 12-inch screen from 1937, by the British Marconi

 

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A Baird Lyric with a 12-inch screen, 1946

 

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Tele-Tone TV-209 (1949)

 

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A Teleavia Panoramic III, designed by Philippe Charbonneaux, 1957

 

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The 21-inch Philco Tandem Predicta with a 25 ft. cord between the screen and the cabinet, 1958

 

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Philco Safari, the first transistor portable television, 1959

 

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The 15 pound (6.8 kg) set had a 2 inch display and worked with a 7.5V rechargeable battery.

Panasonic/National Flying Saucer (but also known as The Eyeball, originally TR-005 Orbitel), produced by Panasonic in the late 1960s and early 1970s

 

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It had a five-inch screen, earphone jack, and could rotate 180 degrees on its chrome tripod.

The Keracolor Sphere, designed by Arthur Bracegirdle, 1968-1977

 

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This English set, an icon of the Space Age, was really expensive because of its small size. It was available in various colors.

The JVC Videosphere, introduced in 1970, and produced to the early 1980s

 

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Inspired by Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey, and appeared in the Conquest of The Planet of the Apes (1972) and in The Matrix (1999).

 

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Sinclair Microvision TV (Model MTV-1), 1977

 

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The first ever miniature television with its 2 inch screen wasn’t a real sales success: it was really expensive, priced like the average models.

 

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Seiko T 001 TV Watch, 1982

 

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Casio TV-70, the portable TV from the early 1980s with “Solar Projection System”, 1986

 

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Behind the cool name it was just a mirror that reflects the picture from the LCD screen. The only 13 mm thin TV worked with 3 AAA-size batteries and had a 2-inch black and white screen.

 

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Not exactly sure what the make and name of this wild TV is. Almost looks like a stove is built into it. But what an enjoyable way to cook dinner, watching Spock and Bones McCoy sparring.

 

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Twisted Towers

One of the latest design trends that seems to have found appeal among some architects is a towering skyscraper that twists its way up to the top. Possibly the first, modern, twisted skyscraper constructed was the Turning Torso in Malmö, Sweden. The residential building is constructed in nine segments of five-story pentagons that twist as it rises, with the topmost segment twisted 90 degrees with respect to the ground floor. The construction of this building was featured on Discovery Channel’s “Extreme Engineering” TV program. The tower received some more publicity when on 18 August 2006, Austrian skydiver Felix Baumgartner jumped off it and parachuted to the ground.

After the successful completion of the Turning Torso, designers started proposing similar audacious structures elsewhere. Many projects got shelved, others were passed and built, and a handful of them are currently under construction. Here we explore some of the most twisted skyscraper designs around the world, but first, a few pictures of the tower that started it all.

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Turning Torso, Malmo, Sweden

The project was designed by the Spanish architect Santiago Calatrava and officially opened on 27 August 2005. The tower reaches a height of 190 metres (623 feet) with 54 stories – 147 apartments, relax/lounge/spa, wine cellar followed by around-the-clock Concierge service 365 days a year. Each floor consists of an irregular pentagonal shape rotating around the vertical core, which is supported by an exterior steel framework. Completed in 2005, the Turning Torso is the tallest skyscraper in Sweden and all the Nordic countries, and presently the third tallest residential building in Europe.

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Infinity Tower, Dubai

Infinity Tower is 306 metres (1,004 ft) tall with 76 stories and is under construction in Dubai, United Arab Emirates, which when completed, will become the world’s tallest high rise building with a twist of 90˚. The tower is designed by Skidmore, Owings and Merrill SOM architectural group, the same group who built the Burj Khalifa also in Dubai and Trump Tower in Chicago.

Construction of the building began in February 2006 and by 2012, the intended height was reached. Unlike the Turning Torso, which is a series of cantilevered plates rotated about a straight structure, Infinity Tower’s much larger floor plates actually require the structure to be twisted as it raises from level to level. Each floor is rotated by 1.2˚ to achieve the full 90˚ spiral, creating the shape of a helix. The tower will have residential apartments, conference rooms, tennis courts, pools, a state of the art gymnasium, a nursery and a spa.

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Absolute World Towers, Mississauga, Canada

Absolute World is a residential twin tower skyscraper complex in Mississauga, Ontario. One is 179 meters tall while the other stands at 161 meters. Both towers twist 209 degrees from the base to the top. The building has been nicknamed the “Marilyn Monroe” tower due to its curvaceous, hourglass figure likened to actress Marilyn Monroe.

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Kuwait Trade Center

Kuwait Trade Center, also known as Al Tijaria Tower, is a magnificent 218 meter tall tower in Kuwait City and currently the tallest building in Kuwait.

 

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Revolution Tower, Panama City

The Revolution Tower is a controversial “corkscrew” tower complex of modern offices in Panama City, just a few minutes away from the banking center. The 242-meter reinforced concrete tower consist of 52 floors and makes a 360 degree turn as it rises up.

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Mode Gakuen Spiral Towers, Nagoya

Mode Gakuen Spiral Towers is a 170-meter, 36-storey educational facility located on a busy main street of Nagoya City in front of Nagoya Station in Nakamura-ku, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan. The towers’ wing-like shape, narrow at the top, changes the rotation axis as they rise and create an organic curve. Spiral Towers appears to change shape slightly when viewed from different angles, giving an elegant yet dynamic impression. The strong inner truss tube is visible through gaps between the three wings, highlighting the bold design and structure while demonstrating the overall consistency.

The towers are highlighted with many ecological features, such as a double-glassed air flow window system and a natural air ventilation system.

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Ohio Cops on the Hunt for ‘Bigfoot’

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Authorities in Beaver Township, Ohio have embarked on an unexpected search for Sasquatch following a strange theft in the area.

Arlene Fitzer, owner of Farmer Dave’s Gift and Garden Shoppe, reported to police that three hand-painted Bigfoot statues were stolen from in front of their store.

The ne’er-do-wells behind the heist were apparently quite determined to bag the Bigfoot because two of the tributes to the cryptid weighed an incredible 225 pounds!

In keeping with the baffling nature of Bigfoot, Fitzer was mystified that anyone was strong enough to lift the weighty Sasquatch statues.

And with one of the statues measuring nearly four feet tall, she wondered where the thieves planned to hide such a eye-catching piece of artwork.

Nonetheless, Fitzer was rather dismayed that they have gone missing, since the total value of the stolen statues was around $300.

Fortunately, the Beaver Township police department is now on the case and they hope to pull off what so many in reality television have so far failed to do: find Bigfoot or, at least, whoever stole the statues.

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The Museum of Failures

Every successful product launch is usually preceded by a string of failures, but we only remember the winners and ignore the failures and pretend they never happened. A new museum is set to open in Sweden that hopes to make this right.

The “Museum of Failures” is the brainchild of Dr. Samuel West, an organizational psychologist, who has spent the last seven years studying failure and success and what people say about both.

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Dr. Samuel West holding the Nokia N-Gage.

“I got tired of all of this glorifying of success, especially within the domain of innovation where 80 to 90 percent of all projects fail,” Dr. West said.

Then, he stumbled into the Museum of Broken Relationships—which collects mementos from failed romances and displays them under glass—while he was on a family trip to Zagreb, Croatia, and he had a light bulb moment.

“I rushed out, and I had this sort of eureka moment that I’m going to start the Museum of Failures. Like, there’s no going back,” Dr. West told NPR.

The purpose of the museum, Dr.West says, is to show that innovation requires failure. “If you are afraid of failure, then we can’t innovate,” he said.

Scheduled to open in June this year, the museum will showcase over sixty failed products and services from around the world. “Every item provides unique insight into the risky business of innovation,” the museum’s website says.

Some of the products that will be on display includes —Harley-Davidson perfume; Bic pens made especially for women; Coca-Cola Blak, a coffee-inspired drink; Nokia N-Gage that was a mobile phone and a gaming console in one; Apple Newton, a personal digital assistant; beef lasagna from Colgate; and more recent products such as Amazon Fire Phone and Google Glass.

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The Twitter Peek, a device for tweeting, launched in 2008.

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Frozen beef lasagna from a toothpaste company.

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The Harley-Davidson’s fragrance, according to Dr. Samuel West, was a “total flop.

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Apple Newton, an early PDA.

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Trump: The Game was released in 1989, based on buying and selling properties.

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The Sony Betamax video cassette player, which lost the format war to its rival, VHS.

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Coca-Cola BlaK was a coffee-flavored version of the soft drink, launched in 2006.

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Bic for Her pen, which was discontinued at the end of 2016.

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Google Glass.

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Kodak pioneered the digital camera in the 1990s but failed to market it.

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